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Roger
1st May 2012, 04:37 AM
Hi Alena,
Do the holes appear to be some sort of plastic insert (like footstrap screw inserts on your other boards?
If so they are possibly there to attach a carry net that was at one time a feature of the Serenity.
Are these holes on the top of your Serenity or the bottom?
If they are an insert (or two seperate inserts, they will be watertight and give you no problems.
Until you get a definitive answer, you can put some duct tape or vinyl sail repair tape over them to
keep any water out.
If you could send me a photo of the holes, we can give you a definitive answer.
If not, I know where there is a Serenity and will have a look this coming weekend.
Roger
P.S. May I delete the first post in this thread?
It looks like somehow you cut and pasted the entire menu in .
R

Alena
3rd May 2012, 04:26 PM
Hello Roger
The holes are on the stern, on the top, just where the " Serenity Windsurfing" logo ends. I do have a picture but do not know how to stick it in, plus they are just 2 holes with no inserts.
I will put the duct tape over them
And please delete whatever I did and should not have done.
Thanks
Alena

Jean-Marc
3rd May 2012, 05:28 PM
Alena,

As for the 2 holes above the Serenity *windsurfing* logo on *top* of the stern's deck, there are indeed 2 holes (at 55 cm and at 65.5 cm from the stern of my Serenity mk I wood) with plugs to let you screw in 2 screws and washers to attach the Starboard rolling trolley called the "Clipper Wheels" (http://2007.star-board.com/viewpage.php?page_id=11). These 2 holes are perfectly normal and watertight, no worries.

Cheers !

JM

Jean-Marc
9th May 2012, 05:10 PM
http://2006.star-board.com/products/accessories.asp

Clipper Wheel :

"The Clipper Wheel from Starboard is as its name implies, simply a large roller-wheel that clips on to the tail of virtually any board with a Tuttle box. With its large diameter wheel, the Clipper Wheel functions on all surfaces including sand. Primarily designed for the staff at windsurfing schools, the wheel clips on and off in an instant without the need for any additional tools. Being able to remove the wheel at the water's edge leaves you a clean board. For the more regular sailor, it is also convenient to have the Clipper Wheel system clipped on to your boardbag: it makes it easy to transport your full kit in one go from the garage to the car, from car park down to the water, or around the airport from one terminal to another.

Clips on and off in an instant without tools.
Works on sand"


Cheers !

JM

Alena
28th May 2012, 01:36 AM
Hello Jean Mark
I took my new Serenity to the beach with a 10 meter sail and it was so awesome. There was not much wind and I was the only one on the water while everybody stayed at home.
The board actually catches waves and definitely gets cuts through the waves easily.
Unfortunately I was not careful and allowed the cover to the "cup holders" to float away and it is gone.
Any idea where I can get a new one?
Also what is the trick to tack it efficiently?
Thanks
Alena

Alena
28th May 2012, 01:26 PM
Hi Jean - Marc
Could you also let me know if there is a benefit to sailing the Serenity with a 10 meter sail?
Somebody told me it is not necessary and would sail just as well with a smaller sail?
Thanks
Alena

Roger
30th May 2012, 01:53 AM
Hi Alena,
I would suggest you purchase or borrow a GPS unit (handheld in a waterproof pack/bag) and do your own tests.
Try your 10.0 m2 rig ....its heavy and cumbersome to use such a large sail on such a narrow platform as the Serenity.
Then take a 7.5 m2 free race sail (Sailworks Retro etc) and sail about the same courses.
I think you will find the 10.0 m2 rig that JM uses is to race with sailboats on a regular yacht racing triangular
course, not free sailing back and forth.
I will be very suprised if you find that the 10.0 m2 moves the Serenity more that 1 knot faster than
a good drafty 7.5 m2 rig in 5-10 knots of wind.

I sailed the Mk 1 Serenity with sails as small as a 4.2 m2 Sailworks Retro Ripper in fairly light winds and it moved along and tacked/jibed just fine.
I spent alot of time with Jim Drake when he came down to Hatteras as the designer of the Serenity he placed effciency at the top of the list in his design criteria.
His recommended sail size was 7.5 m2 as the optimum.
I've had the Serenity planing (it planes and moves very fast until the tail goes under then it gets real
unstable) with a 4.8 m2 Sailworks Hucker in 20 knots of wind.
As far as tacking, learn to put the mast back as far as you can and keep it there with the foot of the sail
right down on the deck of the Serenity) and learn to step over the mast so you do not bring the sail back up until the nose of the board has passed through the eye of the wind.
Serenity's do not tack real fast, but if you use all the forces and alignments at your disposal, you can get it around fairly quickly. I does take some practice.
What fin are you using?
I often found that a smaller fin (60 cm slalom or race vertical fins worked the best) helped with both the boardspeed (less drag) and made the Serenity significantly easier to turn, tack, and jibe.
You might loose a tiny bit of upwind capability, but the overall Serenity experience was much better with a 60 cm fin.
Per JIm Drake, at your weight, put the mast foot as far forward as it will go.
Go upwind by tipping the board slightly toward the lee rail as this really improves the way the nose bites
into the water and increases the upwind capabily of the fin.
Hope this helps,
Roger

Alena
30th May 2012, 12:25 PM
Hi Roger
That helps a lot. I wish I knew before the last weekend, I pulled some painful spot around my ribs waterstarting the Serenty with that huge sail with half of me going one way and the other hald the other way and something gave up.
I don.t care about one knot of speed so GPS is not necessary..
Where do you think I could get a replacement for the cover over the hole that has the screws for the fin? Mine floated away somewhere towards JFK library in S Boston never to be seen again.
Thanks a lot
Alena

Jean-Marc
31st May 2012, 02:39 PM
Hi Jean - Marc
Could you also let me know if there is a benefit to sailing the Serenity with a 10 meter sail?
Somebody told me it is not necessary and would sail just as well with a smaller sail?
Thanks
Alena

Alena,

That's correct : no needs for a super jumbo sail to enjoy the serene glide of the Serenity in a gentle brise.

However, my approach is a bit different and radical than that of yours as I want to be as fast and as efficient as possible against any sail-powered boat or craft on my home lake. Therefore, I need the most powerfull rig in winds as low as 2-3 knots. I completely agree with Roger that a well grunty 7.5 m2 sail à la Severne Glide is quite efficient as well. However, numerous match racing between 2 Serenitys and sails of 6.0-11 m2 has proven time over time that the biggest sail is always faster in 3-7 knots of winds. Even with the same 11 m2 sail surface, the speed difference between 2 Serenitys can ultimately be influenced by the rider's weight, skills and his sail's trim.

Unless you want to be the fastest rider on your home spot, there is no need for a 10 m2 sail on your Serenity. Sure, I can enjoy riding my Serenity with a smaller sail such as a 8.6 m2 or a 7.7 m2 sail, but I know I will always be faster with a 11.0 m2 sail. The trade-off, as you had discovered yourself first-hand, is that such jumbo sails are a pain to handle once the rig fells into water or when the wind starts to pick up a bit too much.

Serenity wind range for my 183 cm x 65 kg body :

1) Severne Code Red R2 11.0 or Reflex II 11.0 m2 + stock Drake 70 cm XXL fin : 2-7 knots.

Above 7-8 knots of wind, the 11 m2 sail is way too large for the Serenity and I just swap the sail on a dedicated planing board (iSonic117 Wide + 55 cm fin). With that board, I can start and sustain the planing as of 7 knots up to 12 knots of wind.

2) NP RS2 8.2 or Severne Reflex III 8.6 m2 + stock Drake 70 cm XXL fin : 3-10 knots.

Above 10 knots of wind, the 8.6 m2 sail is becoming way too large for the Serenity and I just swap the sail on a dedicated planing board (iSonic117 Wide + 48 cm fin). With that board, I can start and sustain the planing as of 10 knots up to 15+ knots of wind.

3) Severne Code Red 7.7 m2 + stock Drake 70 cm XXL fin : 4-12 knots.

Above 12 knots of wind, the 7.7 m2 sail is way too large for the Serenity and I just swap the sail on a dedicated planing board (iSonic117 Wide + 40 cm fin). With that board, I can start and sustain the planing as of 11-12 knots up to 18+ knots of wind.

Reality check is that I'm always using option (1). I was forced to use options (2) or (3) when mast, boom or big sail of option (1) were broken in winds that were blowing well below the planing threshold of the large slalom board. It's much more fun to glide with the Serenity than to schlogg as a pig with a large slalom board :-) !

As for tacking the Serenity, bank the board with the windward rail up and tilt the rig on the back towards the tail to head up dead upwind. Then, it's way easier to keep your balance when you simply oversheet the sail when you're dead upwind, with your front foot just in front of the mast base. Check out the following video at time 2:05 and 3:28 to see what I mean by sail oversheeting : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V97ikRFQDdU

Finally, you can order any spare part from your starboard dealer. Make sure it's for a Serenity mark I when filling the order.
To avoid loosing that cover as you did, I fix it with a small piece of auto-adhesive Velcro band that is glued into the groove of both the cover and cup holder. Make sure you use the rubber washer with the fin screws to avoid filling the cup holder by water when the board travels into water. When water fills up the cup holder because fin screws are not water-tight, it just make the cover pops out like the cork of a champagne bottle...

Cheers !

JM

Alena
31st May 2012, 06:05 PM
Hello Jean-Marc
The lake you are sailing on is beautiful where is it?
Thanks a lot for that information.
So you do not use the 60 cm fin at all? What is the difference? Does using the smaller fin improve the speed?
I was so happy on the Serenity. I was the only person sailing even the kiters stayed at home. And it catches the small waves which is just happiness for me.
Now there is no reason to stay at home on no wind days. I wish I got the Serenity long time ago, it is going to make my life so much more serene, no more sitting at home and worrying about missing something.
Did you ever paddle it?
I noticed it scratches super easily. NO matter what, if it is touched by an unfriendly object, I think I will have to ignore that?
Thanks a lot and have a nice weekend
Alena

Jean-Marc
31st May 2012, 09:34 PM
Hi Alena,

The lake is lac Monteynard, close to the town of Grenoble in France.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lac_de_Monteynard-Avignonet
http://www.lac-monteynard.com/
It's a great spot for windsurfing. Usually, thermal winds are very light in the morning (1-3 Bft) but starts to pick up at noon up to 4-5-6 Bft until dusk, and this cycle repeats itself every days in the summer.

No, I don't use a 60 cm fin. I did try once a 54 cm race fin with an 8.2 m2 sail in ± 10 knots wind. Pointing upwind is less efficient as expected but speed improves a bit. I also tried a 80 cm fin; pointing was a bit better but speed was dramatically reduced, so I keep using the stock 70 cm fin which is a good compromise between best upwind angle and good speed downwind. I also tried the stock Drake shallow 40 cm plastic fin when I was overpowered with the 11 m2, but I'm not using it anymore because I prefer to swap board and fly at higher speed on the large slalom rocket.

As for kiters, they are a no show unless it's blowing a steady 7 knots wind on my home lake. I've seen once a kitesurfer planing in 5 knots wind but he was using a race kiteboard with 4 big fins and a very large 22 m2 sail. As soon as he was hitting a lull, he was sinking full stop while I was still gliding full speed on the Serenity.

You need a minimum of 2-3 knots of wind to move the Serenity forward with a sail. You can even ride her in no wind by pumping the sail with ample and slow motion.
Yes, I also tried paddling the Serenity in no wind, either with a small 32 cm fin, a 40, a 54 or the stock 70 cm fin. No matter which fin is screwed into her tuttle finbox, the Serenity is quite tippy because of her rounded hull bottom. By comparison, the K15 SUP (± same dimension and outline as that of the Serenity) has a flat hull bottom and is less tippier than the Serenity. I also tried a SUPer 12'6" and this is way more stable and less tippy than paddling the Serenity. So to me, the Serenity is clearly a no-compromise high-performance windsurfing board with limited SUP potential whereas the K15 is a high-performance flat water SUP board with limited windsurfing abilities (only small sail, no railing up with feets pushing over the edge of the windward rail because of the deep monoconcave deck form shape).

As for scratches, I do pay extra attention because it very easy to remove a small chip of gelcoat paint on the hull when hitting the dock, a rock, a pole, a chair or table while lugging her around. It's sheer lenght of 455 cm must not make you to worry, but always keep an eye on her bow and stern. I do keep my woody baby in a dedicated boardbag when not sailing. Dings on the wood deck are immediately sealed with a dab of superglue (Elmer's Products Aron Alpha® 221F Cyanoacrylate Adhesive (Industrial Krazy Glue™) marketed in the US or 3M's Products Cyanolit® Plastic 221-F marketed in Europe).

Cheers and enjoy your serene ride in Boston !

JM

Alena
26th June 2012, 06:15 PM
Hello Roger and Jean-Marc
I took the Serenity out with the 7.5 meter sail and it was fun and much easier. It eliminated my problem sitting at home and deciding if there is enough wind. Now there is enough wind all the time and when it goes up I switch to a regular board.
The Serenity gets these fine grey dark lines on it when it touches anything. Somebody told me to use the same stuff you use on a car to take it out? Is it OK? I would love to take these lines off if possible. They should have put a better surface on it is is very fussy
Thanks a lot
Alena

Jille
29th June 2012, 05:23 PM
I've had a Serenity and enjoyed it a lot.
But taking it to the water gave to much troubles.

Would be nice to have a 3,80 meters Serenity with a retractable daggerboard!

3,80 fits better in my trailer and a 70 cm fin is a bit of a problem in shallow water.
(didn't like the shallow water fin that much)

If such a Serenity will be for sale this fall, I will be the first in line!

Jean-Marc
4th July 2012, 06:57 PM
No need to wait : go get a Phantom 380 or 377 : smaller than a Serenity and with a full retractable daggerboard.

Cheers !

JM

Jille
11th July 2012, 07:54 PM
I have a Phantom-Race 320.
Nice board, don't get me wrong, but it's not like a Serenity in 1-7 knots.

Alena
16th July 2012, 02:23 AM
Hello Jean-Marc
The Serenity is awesome. Today I was on a short board and a 6.5 sail, than the wind died a bit I switched to the Serenity and it went flying. It was wavy and windy and I swear the Serenity in some way likes to catch the waves. When the wind blew it lifted out of the water to the point where I was standing.
I feel so lucky. I did not have to rig another sail and had the best time.
There was this idiotic Macho guy who asked me who talked me into buying the thing? But that wa before I took it out sailing.
Ihad so much fun and without having to rig a 10 meter monster sail .
Everybody should have a Serenity or something of that kind
Alena

Jean-Marc
16th July 2012, 08:12 AM
Dear Alena,

You're entering the fun and exciting part of this amazing board potential. You're discovering what I mean by foiling da big Bertha when half of the hull is out and above of the water surface, bow wave just under the carry handle. Kind of a wide stance with front foot on the windward rail, back foot firmly pressing on the foam cover of the fin screw pit/cooler box. You're flying and reaching up to her topping up speed at about 12-13 knots.

Now, the tricky part is trying not to overturn the board : keep the hull always banked with the windward rail up and the leeward rail down. If you press too much the windward rail down, the board will suddenly overturn and throw you out. If the nose is flying to high in a gust, just sheet out a bit your sail, the nose will go down and off you go again full speed. In other words, you can adjust the nose pitch just by sheeting in and out the sail while maintaining the board always banked on her leeward rail.

You did that on a windy day with a 6.5 m2 sail which gave you the best time without rigging your monster sail. The beauty is that you can do the same kind of Serenity foiling with your 10 m2 sail but this time on a very light wind day, say 5-7 knots of wind ! Yes, you will start to appreciate that kind of foiling da big Bertha more and more, believe me, it's kind of addictive...!

Agree with your motto : everybody should have a Serenity in their quiver. The best light wind board ever designed. Nothing compares to her, even the fancy windSUP are no match to her.

Cheers and ride on !

JM

Alena
3rd September 2012, 02:19 PM
Hi Jean -Marc
I took the Serenity out yesterday and it was the most incredible experience. The wind was 8-15 knots and the Serenity with the 10 meter sail went flying. Ofcourse I could barely hold that sail.
Coming back with the waves the board just flew, surfing all the way back the most incredible surfing experience.
How does that work with such a large fin?
The Serenity is a lot of fun in waves as long as there is wind to lean on.
It is the best purchase I ever made . I call her the "Princess of Windsurfing."
Thanks

Alena

Alena
12th October 2012, 08:04 PM
Hi Jean -Marc
Can you tell me what paint do you use for minor abrasions on the wood deck of the Serenity?
And is the Epoxy stick OKfor any hull repair?
Thanks a lot
Alena

Roger
12th October 2012, 11:53 PM
Hi Alena,
Epoxy ding stick is probably not the best product to use.
It'd a bit hard to get it to fair in well, and it hardens very hard so it does not sand well.
West systems epoxy resin ( 2 part) is probably the best product to use.
Get the slow set hardener and use alot of tape to keep it off area adjacent to the repair.
Can you describe the "grey lines" a bit further.
You can use regular automotive carnuba wax, or get one of the carnuba based boat
waxes that are made for fiberglass boats.
Be careful of products with alot of abrasve in them, you don't want to remove the finish/paint,
just clean off the gray lines.
Are these at the water line i.e could these lines be caused by the water where you are sailing?
Roger

Alena
15th October 2012, 02:11 PM
Hi Roger
I did clean off the grey lines like you said. The issue is the beautiful wood deck of the Serenity has areas that look white and dry more like an abrasion, this mostly towards the edges of the deck, maybe the boom brushed over it. It is not a ding , looks more like an abrasion and it is not deep, just like skinning your knee. There are little lines on the deck that look like it in other places. Seems like wood that needs staining but what do I know.
Also I have trouble getting the fin out after sailing , should I send it a bit?
I took the Serenity out yesterday in the usual up and down wind here and while th others were stuck between the gusts, I was having great time and when the gust came just flying. I started enjoying the Serenity more than my large board.
Thanks a lot
Alena

Roger
15th October 2012, 11:44 PM
Hi Alena,
" did clean off the grey lines like you said."
OK! Grey lines are taken care of and you now have a way to clean them off when they reappear.

"The issue is the beautiful wood deck of the Serenity has areas that look white and dry more like an abrasion, this mostly towards the edges of the deck, maybe the boom brushed over it. It is not a ding , looks more like an abrasion and it is not deep, just like skinning your knee. There are little lines on the deck that look like it in other places. Seems like wood that needs staining but what do I know."

Your analysis is probably "spot on".
The absolute best product to use would be some penetrating epoxy. The whiteness you are seeing is probably dryer areas in the wood where it did not soak up enough epoxy resin when your board was manufactured. It's very difficult to get a "perfect soak" over several pieces of very thin wood veneer (0.010 mm thick).
So, the penetrating epoxy is about the best you can get as it will be absorbed by the dryer areas in the wood veneer to the extent possible. Jamestown Dist. has this product as well as most boat supply shops.
West Systems also now markets a penetrating epoxy.

"Also I have trouble getting the fin out after sailing , should I send it a bit?"
Better to rub it with a bar of soap (as a lubricant). If it does not slide in and out easily, take a look at
the surfaces of the fin root when you have it out and you should see areas that are black and shiny.
Those are the tight areas. Better to use a smooth flat file and just work down the shiny spots.
What fin are you using? Still the wide 70 cm that came as OEM in the board.
Try a 60 cm vertical race fin sometime. You will love it with your 7.5 m2 rig. You aren't racing so the
absolute best upwind angle is not that important, plus you can rail the board (more controllably with the
60 cm) and get the nose of your Serenity to "bite" into the water and take you upwind extremely high and fast.

I took the Serenity out yesterday in the usual up and down wind here and while th others were stuck between the gusts, I was having great time and when the gust came just flying. I started enjoying the Serenity more than my large board.
If you have a place close to the water and don't have to transport the Serenity hull (car top or?) they are
really a fun board to sail.
I have lot's of fond memories of things that happened while sailing the Serenity.

"Thanks a lot"
You are most welcome!

Enjoy,
Roger

Alena
17th October 2012, 12:52 AM
Hi Roger
Thanks a lot for all the help.
The Serenity is actually easy to lift up on the car and after that hangs on pulleys in the garage. And considering the amount of windsurfing junk the average windsurfer accumulates it is not big deal , just one more.
Can you tell me what is this penetrating Epoxy called.?
By the way do you still go to Bonaire and if so when?
Thanks
Alena

Roger
17th October 2012, 01:41 AM
Hi Alena,
You can find it by googling "Penetrating epoxy".
I've sent off an email to Eva-M Holman "The Board Lady" to
see what she recommends.
Any way you can send some photos of the spots on the deck
of your Serenity so Eva and I can zero in on the best materials
to repair it to it's original state?
No, I haven't been back to Bonaire in a few years as I'm back working on the
Aircraft Carrier landing systems agian almost full time.
I hope to maybe sneak away to Bonaire this winter but it will have to fit
between work missions.
Regards,
Roger

Roger
17th October 2012, 02:46 AM
Alena,
Just got a reply back from Eva (The Board Lady).
She suggests "Smith and Co. Penetrating Resin.
Should be available at Jamestown distributors.
Roger

Alena
21st July 2013, 10:38 PM
Hello Roger
The Serenity is back on the water and thanks to you and Eva for all the good advice.
The board is unbelievable.
Today I was the only person sailing , even the kiters stayed home due to what looks to everybody else like a no wind day.
It was about 5-8 knots, I rigged it with the 10M sail and went flying. The board just flies, catches waves and in the process you get a steady shower for the hot day here. It is definitely my favourite.
I may need another one on 10 years, hope they make them again
Have a nice Summer
Alena

Roger
21st July 2013, 11:20 PM
Hi Alena,
Sounds like lot's of fun....those are my memories of the Serenity....it did not matter if there was wind, I had fun on the Serenity even in very light patchy winds (just little williwaws across the top of the water).
Take care of your Serenity and she will last longer than 10 years.
I still think a 10 m2 rig for a small but solid lady is a little much. Not sure you are going any faster than
you would with a 7.5-8.5 free race sail that has a really good low end. You'd work a whole lot less at
getting the rig out of the water and holding in up.
Regards,
Roger