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windsurferdagg
24th June 2007, 07:08 AM
I went to see the Tabou Rocket 115 that I was interested in, but on the bottom, there is a bubble. Somebody said that could be dilamination or something.

Just wondering what it could be, and should it put me off buying it. Its closer to the nose, not the tail so it won't affect trim while planing at all I don't think

Thanks anyone,

Thomas

Randy
24th June 2007, 09:15 AM
Visit Boardlady.com. She has a picture of a repaid job on a board with a bubble on bottom. Doesn't look like a minor issue to me.

http://www.boardlady.com/bottombubble.htm

steveC
24th June 2007, 10:01 AM
Hi Thomas,

Anything on its way out is foolish to invest in. Although you might be able to savage an illusion through a repair procedure, still you're in dangereous territory for the future. Don't focus on the cheap side of the game, it's a lame approach. Best to concentrate on quality. What's that? An interesting question, but the bottom line might be viewed as a viable warranty. I've gone outside the margin and found success, but I have also found abject failure too.

Hey, you're rolling the dice, what do you think?

windsurferdagg
24th June 2007, 10:50 AM
Its so hard to say... I am selling my Go 139 to buy this tabou rocket, I tried the board today and was amazed at the speed, manueverability and jumping power that it has. I want to get it, but if it breaks, I don't have another board to replace it... I am stuck with no windsurfin for a while...

So It is a small bubble, I might ask the guy who is sellin it for a picture. Its not eve the size of my palm. I would say 2 inchs diameter... it looks like the maker just got air trapped when curing it

Thomas

Guest
24th June 2007, 06:37 PM
Looking at your equipment (ie only a Go) .. any other board will feel fast!

Just relax and try some others. The fanatics are awesome and try a SB also.

windsurferdagg
24th June 2007, 09:06 PM
ya I am. i like the fanatic hawk. or the starboard s type... but unfortunatly, can't afford those. I can't get much more than 1000 for my Go 139 2006 (even though its barly used) so my choices are limited.

Thomas

Roger
24th June 2007, 09:13 PM
Hi Thomas,
Did you take a look at the link on "The Board Lady" website?
"Bubbles" in the bottom of a board indicate some form of delamination.
It could be a manufacturing defect, but most often they are caused by moisture getting inside the board and the board being "heated up" enough to cause an abnormal build up of pressure inside.
This is what causes the delamination.
If you intend to have the board repaired, by a professional (like Eva, the Board Lady) she/he can use a moisture meter to examine the entire board and determine if there's additional pockets of moisture inside the skin of the board. If there are additional pockets of moisture inside the skin, the board needs to be dryed out internally using a vacuum pump.
Then each delamination (moisture pocket) must be opened up and the wet decomposed foam removed, the pocekt filled with expaning foam (as it is in the photos of the bubble repair) and then the damaged areas faired in and a new skin applied to each damaged area.
Ask the guy who's selling the board if he ever left the vent plug loose, or out of the board, or if there was some unrepaired damage that he sailed the board with, allowing water inside the core of the board.
Hope this helps,

Phill104
25th June 2007, 12:19 AM
Thomas,

Sounds like you should let this one go. There will be loads more boards up for grabs.

In a couple of weeks *board will be launching their new range. Traditionally, lots of used boards come on the market as people decide to renew. I'm sure something like a Carge 111,122 or an Stype will be available at a price you can afford very soon. The carves are especially good.

windsurferdagg
25th June 2007, 12:57 AM
ahahaha alright... if anyone has any boards that will be in total for me under a 1000 CND, let me know ;)

steveC
25th June 2007, 08:09 AM
Hi Thomas,

Really, you're still on the upside of the game with your GO139, and don't think for a second that that board won't work to your advantage for some time. The lost opportunity with the Rocket was probably a lesson in restraint, to ulimately hone your future. Now, you have more time to plan a more suitable outcome.

windsurferdagg
25th June 2007, 11:12 AM
Can you further explain your idea steveC? To hone my future... etc. Do you mean save up for a "perfect" board? or get my jibes nailed before I get a smaller board? The main thing about the go is I hate the weight and the beginner footstrap positions. I never used them, never will. Don't use the center handle or the side fins or even the nose handle. I am pretty sure I got onto a plane sooner with the rocket too. Maybe I still have to figure out the wide board technique, but I was just wondering what you meant in your respnonse

thanks

Thomas

steveC
26th June 2007, 01:25 AM
Hi Thomas,

There's no doubt from your comments that you're mentally ready to move on to a different board, but let me better understand things a bit. From what I can tell, the GO has 3 different footstrap positions, with the most outboard ones designed for more advanced sailors. The fact that the board has more inboard positions available that you not using shouldn't be a problem. Most production boards these days have many footstrap options, even shapes targeting more advanced level sailors. Similarly, the GO's inclusion of other non-performance features that you don't intend to use means little in the big picture.

What I think is really eating you now is the added weight and volume of the GO. Mentally you want to move on and now feel trapped in a way with a slug of sorts. I can understand your dilemma, but I think it was in your best interest to let the Rocket go, as it had a worrisome construction problem. Looking to the future, I know that you're going to continue your quest to find a lighter and lower volume board that better meets your changing goals. Nothing wrong with that. But, in the meantime, you still have the GO, and it's very likely that there still some potential left that you can leverage off of to hone your skills. I don't know if you saw James' longboard thread on the forum where there was a video of this younger sailor doing a lot of trick board and sail maneuvers on a Starboard Start, arguably a much larger and heavier beginner's board. Although the focus was totally freestyle in nature, I still have no doubt that this kid could make that Start sing just sailing along.

I wouldn't worry too much about finding a more suitable board, it will definitely happen. Just make sure that its construction integrity is sound. Until then, try to think positive about what you've got, as you're still in a great position to have fun.

windsurferdagg
26th June 2007, 03:13 AM
ah k just wanted to make sure I understood what you meant. I actually thought there was some secret to make the go faster etc... I have tried my friends 44 cm fin and it loosens the board up a bit, but its still hard to jump :(... But I was thinking, if I can get the go jumping, than when I get a smaller board, it should be a breeze to jump... kind of like hockey players skating with parachutes to make them faster.

But ya, im not getting the rocket... But I do like the larger supercross boards. Around 115-125 litres is perfect I think. Does any one have any suggestions for boards in that range that are good for speedier sailing and are reasonably good at jumping and learning loops? I have heard things about the kombat areo but are they good or bad?

thanks

Thomas

Guest
26th June 2007, 04:16 AM
smaller boards == less oppertunity to ride "fully lit" (concerning the fact that you are using your Go as often (always) as possible). Just get yourself a really cheap ADDITIONAL board (like < 400$CND). This way you have both.