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View Full Version : Does your Hyper snot the Isonics Upwind?


Guest
29th June 2007, 11:19 AM
Mine does.

Maximus
29th June 2007, 11:25 AM
I can't say enough about my H111. With my local racing scene the Guys on thier Isonics can't keep up upwind. All our local races are slalom and the course is reaching. There is always an upwind leg as the wind is always moving.

Long live the Hyper!:p

Screamer
29th June 2007, 04:27 PM
I haven't tested them on the same day, but I'm pretty sure it's better in extreme upwind and downwind angles. But ...... there is more to a board's performance than these extreme angles. Since I've sailed hyper for 3 seasons, before 2006, this is my summary:
1. Similar behavior with a massive range of sails (approx. 6-9m, even more for some sailors), yet to be surpassed, the biggest plus in my book
2. Up to a point, cushions and ignores chop
3. When it planes, it seems that it never stops. But also, when off the plane, not easy to get lit. Peculiar on/off difference between shlogging and planing
4. On other slalom designs, both old and new, you seem to have more influence via input, and more response from the board. Hyper is like a train in its tracks, (just about as sensitive;).
5. Stiff gybing, compared to other slalom/freeride stuff.
Can you tell it I liked it at the time? I'm trying to be objective and time moves on.

So, does your hyper regularly snot the iSonics in slalom races?;)

Guest
30th June 2007, 12:56 AM
It just depends on the fin (AND on the rider). Fin for extra upwind (e.g. Select RS07 51) on iS133 and it will smoke the Hyper.
Stock 48 fin is quite amazing goes well upwind and downwind it "smokes" the RS07 51 (the only 3 sparing partners I had had no chance on any course).

Guest
1st July 2007, 09:29 AM
No doubt the deep double concaves are really good when up to speed and not so good at low speed. I have owned a number of boards with pronounced double concaves. It is a personal preference but they do have a smooth ride all of their own. Plus they do get by with smaller fins, thus less drag. Gybing is actually OK but requires its own technique. A niche area of the sport perhaps, but has its own rewards.