PDA

View Full Version : Windsurfing a fringe sport!


Windhex
29th February 2008, 12:51 PM
I think windsurfing has evolved into a fringe sport! I see it every
day here in Corpus Christi. Twelve years ago, on a windy day it would
be hard to find a parking place at the most popular venues. Now, we're
lucky if you see 5 or 6 cars at the most popular sites. There used to
be 4 windsurfing shops here but now there is just one, Worldwinds at
Bird Island. Lucky for us it is a good shop with enthusiastic people!
Some windsurfers just flat burned out on the sport and moved on to
other hobbies. I had a guy call me yesterday trying to sell all his
windsurfing gear. He got into motorcycles in a big way and has no
interest in windsurfing and he sail hard and often for 8 years. Some
windsurfers got old and just can't muster the enthusiasm to hit the
water. Some switched to kiting and some moved to the mountains. Some
never made the switch from thinking of it as an "Xtreme Sport" to
letting it be a "Life Sport", The one thing we all failed to do was
bring new, young people into the sport to keep the stoke alive. Many
people tried, but windsurfing just didn't seem to connect with the new
generation.

Also, a couple years of light winds didn't help! This year is shaping
up to be more like one of the great years like "back in the day"!
Since January I've sailed about 3 days a week, with 2 of those days
being in wind in excess of 30 mph! Today it was winds 26 to 35 mph
with gusts near 40!


So, yes, my opinion is "it has become a fringe sport", but heh, it's
my fringe sport!

Unregistered
29th February 2008, 02:00 PM
more focus on developing youth and junior windsurfers -Techno 293 and FE classes ; and programmes for young slalom and freestyle riders ( eg IFCA festivals and *board pro kids )

Unregistered
29th February 2008, 02:33 PM
"more focus on developing youth and junior windsurfers -Techno 293 and FE classes ; and programmes for young slalom and freestyle riders ( eg IFCA festivals and *board pro kids )"

empty words. if you want masses to be involved you should live in communism and get huge support from state. or be a good lobist. "windsurfer lobist???" - "lobist of what???". sounds like anecdote

Unregistered
29th February 2008, 03:19 PM
Indeed.
Where i live in Canada theres 6 to 8 guys that sail here, in a city of 125,000 people.
talk about fringe !!!
Most people like sports that are easy. Tradtionally sports in this northern Canadian town in the summer are baseball ie: slowpitch in the summer ,and fishing hunting if those are sports!
There easy to do and dont take much effort.
even skiing up here has taken a backseat to snowmobiling ,used to have 5 ski hills 20 years ago now theres 2!!!!
skiing being alot harder to master then operating the throttle of a snowmobile. Snowmobilign a heelof alot more expenisive .
i guess thats why jetskiis are so popular with the redneck crowd as a water activity, again i wont call it a sport.
shredulato

Unregistered
29th February 2008, 03:35 PM
It has also declined in Europe.

Unregistered
1st March 2008, 02:33 AM
doesn't hurt to give it a nudge, raise the profile a bit
be proud of your sport who knows what can be achieved
http://www.nationalwindsurfingweek.org/

steveC
1st March 2008, 09:53 AM
I have to sadly admit that windsurfing is a fringe sport, but that doesn't take from the stoke of its steely core. Much of the time I sail alone, but that doesn't discourage me. The fact that most don't seem to participate, doesn't limit the vision and opportunities, because I find that those that see windsurfing when things are up, understand what's going on. I know that they're clearly envious. Their obvious interest, focus and overall appreciation says it all. The best in life takes a bit of stress and challenge, but the rewards are truly worth it.

Unregistered
1st March 2008, 11:19 AM
Fringe Sport? does it really matter, I prefer it that way!!!!!!!! there 's enough people involved worldwide for companies to still invest in it, that's good enough!!!!!

Unregistered
1st March 2008, 11:54 AM
Well to be honest, it was a blow to my fragile male ego, when I was hitting on a hot young thing at a Maui hotspot...proudly announced to her I was a windsurfer from Colorado....she sniffed: "Windsurfing is so not cool..."

Ugggggg.....

pierrec45
1st March 2008, 05:20 PM
> there 's enough people involved worldwide for companies
> to still invest in it, that's good enough!!!!!

You don't understand much, do you? Companies don't "invest" in your well-being. They develop products that will make profits, they create a need with magazines 2008 new board reviews and make sails .02 meters apart so you feel you need to buy more to be like the pros they flash all over the net and mags and videos you buy. NONE of the current windsurfing suppliers are NPOs. And this is all normal.

And prices are not going down at all because fewer people sail, no scale savings, less competition, etc.

Back to the topic: yes it is fringe now. I don't care about being a freak (I do freestyle, and often sail old gear, so I'd better not care about being a freak).

I just find it sad for those who could get into our great sport and don't, that's all. All those that wanted, were taught on the wrong equipment/conditions and gave up. Those that think it's an expensive sport by looking at the quiver guys (it's not an expensive sport) and won't try. Those that go to stores and are told that kiting is more fun and the "in" thing, and so on.

Too bad for them. Not enough sports and outdoor activity in our society - no need for stats here.

Not enough passion - just look around. Too many people watch TV and shop and renovate their house forever.

Not enough cheap fun in our society - skiers always require the latest expensive gear, all local sailboats here are brand new and quarter million min, etc.

That's all.

Unregistered
1st March 2008, 07:30 PM
> there 's enough people involved worldwide for companies
> to still invest in it, that's good enough!!!!!

You don't understand much, do you? .

Well at least your not arrogant, judgemental and opinionated

That's the Problem with the internet people can just get away with being so rude without the consequences of real life

pierrec45
1st March 2008, 08:29 PM
> That's the Problem with the internet, people can just get away with
> being so rude without the consequences of real life

It's good that you know about the "consequences of real life"...

So ya think we're fringe or not? :)

Unregistered
1st March 2008, 10:01 PM
Franchie is so very arrogant.

Unregistered
1st March 2008, 11:26 PM
how did windsurfing go from mainstream to fringe?????

remember when windsurfing was on all the trailers for miami vice with that cool soundtrack?

ohhhhh the glory days....

Bill
2nd March 2008, 12:15 AM
how did windsurfing go from mainstream to fringe?????

remember when windsurfing was on all the trailers for miami vice with that cool soundtrack?

ohhhhh the glory days....


Yes! Yes! Yes! It was great.

The old head dip, ah! Happy days.

Cool dudes, fast cars and boats.

Maybe the answer is better PR?

Unregistered
2nd March 2008, 12:28 AM
you forget the more important ingredient: hot chicks!!!!!

:-)




"Yes! Yes! Yes! It was great.

The old head dip, ah! Happy days.

Cool dudes, fast cars and boats.

Maybe the answer is better PR?"

CoolTube
2nd March 2008, 12:34 AM
how did windsurfing go from mainstream to fringe?????

remember when windsurfing was on all the trailers for miami vice with that cool soundtrack?

ohhhhh the glory days....


Enjoy! ANd yes, those were the glory days!


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LGkurWAXgZs

WILDWINDSCA
2nd March 2008, 06:58 AM
Fringew ...fringe is great!!!
when it comes to windsurfing i'll take fringe any day!! Heck i'll make it better I'll dress funny, act funny and if people dont like me for who i am...... too bad , then they will give me my space!
there nothing more boring and ordinary ,


then being ordinary.

steveC
2nd March 2008, 08:55 AM
While i'm hanging with the fringe concept, as it's an actual reality in my locale, I did want to highlight something important. Although many folks don't have the energy and desire to windsurf, they fundamentaly appeciate seeing the sport in action. Even though bringing folks into the sport is an awfully tough responsibility to achieve (practically impossible in my mind and experience, I can say without a doubt that observers can find and see the stoke in our sport, and ultimately, they can be honest supporters in their own way. We don't want to discount that. Voters at any locale can help our cause.

RobSwift
2nd March 2008, 06:31 PM
Fringe Sport? does it really matter, I prefer it that way!!!!!!!! there 's enough people involved worldwide for companies to still invest in it, that's good enough!!!!!
Fringe of what? It's a specialty sport. Fringe is a bad choice of a word. Given it's difficulty that is rather understandable. Many people are excluded from participating due to it's level of difficulty. Not only that, it's equipment intensive and terrain specific, so many are excluded due to their finances and lack of beach access.

pierrec45
3rd March 2008, 03:01 AM
> given it's difficulty
> many people are excluded from participating due to ... difficulty.

Can't be that difficult, anyone I've ever taught, who was serious, got to learn. And in the old days, about nobody would "fail" to learn.

> Not only that, it's equipment intensive and terrain specific, so
> many are excluded due to their finances and lack of beach access.

Ditto: it needs not be equipment intensive, plenty of 3-7 year-old cheap gear around that sails just fine.

However you're right: people see expensive gear out and *think* it's expensive. It's like sailing (I also own a sailboat): it's much, much cheaper than people ever think. It just that it looks difficult and expensive from afar.

Cheers for now.

steveC
3rd March 2008, 05:03 AM
Let's be honest pierrec,

Being prepared for all outcomes (and really having fun too) requires a fairly focused stable of stuff. Regardless of the product's presence on the current market at this immediate time, I can agree with you to some degree, as 3-5 year old stuff isn't necessarily bad at all. But, the condition of the product, and its quality (in its prime) says everything. So, low dollar fishing on the old market undoubtedly requires some expertise and knowledge to ensure reasonable success. Buying somebody else'e dud is not helpful overall. Believe me, I've tried to sell those as quickly as possible, even at an attractive value.

Philip
3rd March 2008, 06:20 AM
Yes I think 'specialty' is a better description for sure. Also I think antiquated gear should be taken to the recyling plant; I know many of us learnt on such, but not so many stayed for the long haul did they? Todays gear is of course so much better to learn on and keep people interested. Why go back in time when other sports like mountain bikes and snow skis are modernising at a rate of knots. Modern gear can be had at a reasonable price.

C249
4th March 2008, 05:58 AM
Philip, it's hard to keep people in for the long haul when the industry is telling them that the sailing they do and the gear they do it on is old-fashioned and slow and should be thrown away, and replaced by something that won't normally work as well when they head down to the beach. I'm sure that now the sport has moved to widestyle boards that plane early, we'll agree that the '80s and '90s gear people were levered into after the sport's boomtime was NOT well suited to the conditions most of us sail in. Don't blame the gear that created the boomtime for the collapse that may have been caused by the gear people bought AFTER the boomtime (sinkers for lake sailors, DSBs they couldn't gybe, etc).

On the average day in most places in the world, the really old stuff is often better performing than the new stuff.

I don't know what's happening in skiing but I'm not sure the MTB analogy is right. The modern MTB seems to be at least as tough as the originals; modern boards aren't. The modern MTB goes better on the average day than the originals; modern boards work better only when there's a fair amount of steady wind (unless you want to drag a big sail around, and even then you still need a fair whack of wind to be faster around all angles on the typical waterway). Modern MTBs are easier to own and use than the originals; I'm not sure that a modern board is easier to own and use for most of a typical day on a Bavarian or Parisian lake, Queen Mary reservoir or outside of Des Moines or Sydney and I'm positive it's often slower.

The development of modern windsurfers seems to be a bit more like the development of specialist downhill MTBs; great for certain specialised conditions, but not for normal use on t the average day for the average rider in the average area. It's great stuff, but perhaps also a recipe to create a fringe sport.

Also note that neither dinghy sailing or surfing, the two sports that created our own, have developed dramatically in technology in terms of what the average user owns. If anything, surfing has moved to longer, cheaper pop out boards. Yet neither surfing or dinghy sailing has suffered a drop like windsurfing. And if you blame old gear for the fall off in the numbers who windsurf, then how do you explain the fact that the sport is still pretty small?

I'm not having a go at the gear per se, but more the fact that arguably it is aimed at a narrower spectrum of sailors, areas and conditions. Other sports have widened the available choices (MTBing itself was a widened choice of bike riding, surfing has gone from about one style of board to many, dinghy sailing has opened itself up at each end of the spectrum, etc)

Windsurfing alone of these sports has concentrated on one aspect (planing ie medium/strong wind) performance and windsurfing alone has shrunk dramatically in recent decades......

steveC
5th March 2008, 01:20 AM
Come on C249, let's be fair. I know you have a recurring bone to pick with the windsurfing industry, but you have to admit that many of the leading brands have a full array of board designs for all the possible conditions out there, including the very very light wind scenario. I find it hard to buy the concept that the industry is unduly twisting the customer's arm to make poor decisions.

Really, its up to the customer to pick what's right for their local venues. I think that you need to give the customer more credit here, as most windsurfers are adults who take responsibility for their decisions.

Of course, the windsurfing industry is trying to sell new product, and I think that makes sense from a business standpoint, but customers can elect to buy from a used market if they see a better value for their needs. Without a doubt, many do that and are quite happy with the older gear they acquire. When it comes down to it, when the session is over and there's a smile on someone's face, that's all that matters.

Philip
5th March 2008, 03:24 AM
All good points made above. For myself I had a background with long race boards and loved the way the things railed up and pointed. When teamed with a quality rig (of the time) then in stronger winds I would be all over the top of the run of the mill slalom boards. Also I had a DSB and remember some good times and iffy gybes.

That said, there were some very ordinary long boards out there and the average rigs were well, very average. A couple of seasons ago I had a try on a 'nth' hand long board a friend had bought. Pretty ratty condition all round. I could not sail the darn thing it was so bad. That is the kind of gear that should be taken away and minced.

Sure there will be older hardly used gear. But even then I see so many returning WS people buy such and a month later have moved onto (second hand) modern gear and are progressing happily.

Among more experienced WS I see some moving down to smaller volume boards and more hi tech sails and after a bit moving back up in volume and down in rig complexity as they seek their comfort level. The point being there is a happy medium for everyone - each to their own! There are certainly some good 'plug and play' boards out there and I have experienced the humiliation of being blown into the weeds by such when on my steep learning curve required of some 'specialist' gear. But the payback is there.

C249
5th March 2008, 05:42 AM
Steve, I kept out of the discussion partly to avoid getting back on my rant box and partly to avoid being seen as attacking the industry - until there was a reference to how old bad gear supposedly was. Then I thought I should pose a counter view.

There is a vast amount of evidence that the consumer's choice is very heavily influenced by an industry and advertising. Hell, even economists are realising that people are not particularly rational consumers. I'm not saying that I don't suffer from this as much as anyone else and I probably go too far the other way, but all I'm saying is that it is a very important factor that we cannot just ignore in our consideration of the future of the sport.

More importantly, it's in the industry's short-term interest to ignore the benefits of older gear so the consumer doesn't get to hear about it - which is a balance that some of us are trying to redress.

I certainly don't see much gear for really light winds out there; the Serenity is the only board I can find and it must be hard finding people who are interested in it in this environment. As a mag editor recently admitted, it's almost impossible to find windusrfers who haven't bought into the whole "windsurfing is planing" idea.

The Konas etc are slower than original Windsurfers in light winds in the testing we've done. The long Raceboards (Warp X 380 etc) are developed from a class originally intended to race in winds of 12 knots or more, and which has rules that prevent a Serenity type from being made. In the biggest class (admittedly, not the pro class) in the biggest UK event last year, an original Windsurfer with horrible old floppy dacron 6m finished second, ahead of about 180 modern boards. In what other sport could the original product beat all the high tech stuff in fairly average conditions?

And seeing the crashes that other industries have suffered, I can't accept that the windusrfing industry MUST be right. There were a lot of very smart guys making not-so-great decisions in the US and UK car industries and just before the tech wreck, too.

Phillip, you are 100% right, of course, there is a lot of terrible old gear out there. One thing I do find amazing is the incredibly low quality of the cloth on those old sails, when even in those days there was good stuff. But as you say, some of it was well designed and with some updating (ie better rigs, although not necessarily typical current gear IMHO) it can perform very well. I just don't think the gear that created the boomtime can be blamed for the crash that followed when OTHER gear was then promoted.

nobody
5th March 2008, 10:45 AM
C249 said...
In the biggest class (admittedly, not the pro class) in the biggest UK event last year, an original Windsurfer with horrible old floppy dacron 6m finished second, ahead of about 180 modern boards. In what other sport could the original product beat all the high tech stuff in fairly average conditions?
Interesting photo of the race you mention:
http://www.seabreeze.com.au/forums/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=31813
Results:
http://www.boards.co.uk/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=17949

I still have one of those "horrible old floppy dacron 6m" sails which I find good for light wind freestyle (if you can call what I do that) as I can fall into it without fear of damage. :)

steveC
6th March 2008, 01:29 AM
One thing that is quite obvious from the photo that nobody posted is how that old dacron sail really stands out from a visibility standpoint. One point that has been made in the past is that the transition to monofilm sails really took away from the eye catching spectator appeal found in the older dacron sails. Quite frankly, the colorful nature of today's kites has readily mined the interest of spectators that show up at the beach, especially in light of the active movement and their operating heights. Visual fascination is clearly one of the chief things that influences whether folks make the decision to ultimately participate and invest in a sport.

C249, regarding the issue of customers often being irrational about there purchases, there might be some truth to that, but I really think that usually the customer just isn't seriously following through on their commitments. Much of the fun in windsurfing is planing and moving around at speed, and I believe that's what attacts folks attention and potential interest in the sport. But, as you have correctly noted in the past, planing conditions aren't always available. As a result, many folks just aren't patient enough to optimize and play when the time is right. So, over time, half hearted windsurfers eventually bail on the sport.

Would it have been different if the potential customer originally targeted low wind displacement sailing over the higher wind planing alternative? That's certainly debatable, but I honestly think most folks that hang with the sport over the long haul are looking for excitement and they learn how to make the best with what nature and opportunity provides.

I personally believe that the turn down in the sport from the boom years was its true destiny and fate along the path. That's why many folks have old Windsurfers and the like in their garages gathering dust. Without real excitement and action, folks just got bored and the other responsibilities and interests in life drove them on to different paths. I look back and its so clear and obvious, but its also a bit sad too. Could these folks have been saved? Unfortunately, I have to say "no I don't think so". They simply lost their sense of commitment and it was just easier to move on to different things.

In the end, is displacement sailing in very low winds interesting and fun? For many years I really didn't think so, and I made no effort to invest in that arena. But, as you know from earlier discussion here on this forum, I have ordered a Serenity, and I'm looking forward to the option of sailing in very light winds and doing some casual exploration locally close to home. For many years I drove all over the place trying to optimize my planing time, but now with gasoline getting so expensive, I thought it would be fun and rewarding to play close to home more often and open some new doors. I remain optimistic and ultimately hope that I can find the kind of satisfaction and fulfilment that folks like you have found in light wind sailing. Time will tell.

pierrec45
6th March 2008, 04:49 AM
> how that old dacron sail really stands out from a
> visibility standpoint.

In Australia we say it sticks out like dogs balls. And it really does...

> if the potential customer originally targeted low wind displacement
> sailing over the higher wind planing alternative?

Nobody targets low wind, never met one. One extends interest in windsurfing and increases sailing time by catering to lower winds as well. I'm currently based in inland North america, from Australia. Sydney was all good winds and waves, here if I stuck with my Sydney ocean-side high wind standards I would seldom sail. (As some do here.)

So I decide to practice moves, do fun freestyle, social sailing, teaching kids, etc. Or one can just wait that the wind is good enough for them. Plenty of that here. Less sailing time, lot less. We don't all live in Hawaii.

> That's certainly debatable, but I honestly think most folks that
> hang with the sport over the long haul are looking for excitement
> and they learn how to make the best with what nature and
> opportunity provides.

Mmmh, here at least it's not the all-around crowd that switches to kiting, but the go-right-go-left crowd. I'd get bored, I find they do too. 5 years max. But perhaps it's just here...

Anyhow, all your points well taken, this is a good thread.

Unregistered
9th March 2008, 07:17 PM
Interestingly, where I live in eastern Aus, Windsurfing is looking the best it has looked in the last 8 years. 2001 to 2003 were probably windsurfings lowest point, but since then there has ever slowly been an increase in interest, with more younger people getting involved, and the retailers are doing much better

interested
13th March 2008, 10:43 AM
Is this how the media see windsurfing?

from "the fall of the house of Bush" by Craig Unger
Quote" It did not help that a photograph of Kerry appeared in the national media in late August showing him in an expensive, tightfitting wetsuit and windsurfing, an image that seemed both ill-advised in that it both showed him at leisure and pursuing a FLAKY, NON MAINSTREAM diversion" - capitaised by me.

When refering to US presidentail candidate John Kerry in the last run for election. Kerry windsurfs and kitesurfs.

On another point - if everyone on the forums complains about the cost of windsurfing gear, why do the brands keep coming out with new lightweght boards and increase the cost by $600 over the standard board? Do these boards sell in any numbers? Do the ones complaining still buy them? Do we just whinge as we hand over the money or do stop buying?

Scott333
17th March 2008, 05:08 AM
Here's my two cents. I recently quit after windsurfing for about a year. I learned when I lived on Maui and moved to Oahu for school. I used to go on Maui 3+ times a week and I learned alot, had LOTS of fun. I got some good equipment cheap from Euros that were here for the summer and sold it when they left.

But when I moved to Oahu it was different. The spots here outside of Kailua are few and harder. Like Diamond head. Gusty, reefy long walk, bit too advanced for me. And the wind is not the same at all. I went to Kailua some in the beginning and took out my 90 liter and it was gusty and not good, and I was told(and experienced) my equipment was Maui equipment, not big enoug for Oahu. My boom only held up to like 5.8. Mast too. Had no bigger sails. So Instead of buying new(used) equipment I sold what I had and quit. The surf is so good here I was less inclined to WS and I got a sail boat, so I can still sail.

So my point is, I lived in the best WS place there is, maui, and I thought Oahu was up there too, and it probably is, so if I quit living here, I can't imagine people oding this sport in any but the best places in any significant numbers. It's hard, expensive, fickle, lessons are expensive...

Joe666
17th March 2008, 05:36 AM
I'm with ya, having tortured myself in those exact "fickle" winds!

I don't even know if windsurfing qualifies as a "fringe" sport now, since Clay Feeter changed the name of his formerly "Windsurf Journal" to "Standup Surf & Sail Journal." Windsurf isn't even in the title anymore. Very sad.

Soon, windsurfing will be a relic of the past. 90 year old geezers talkin bout the good ol days...

Unregistered
17th March 2008, 06:02 AM
Those of you that rejoice in the perceived demise of windsurfing must have very limited and boring lives.

You sound like americans?

Well here in Australia, and remember before you flame an aussie... we are one of your staunchest alies, we actually go to war with you, Windsurfing is growing again, many more numbers on the beach than previous years.

3 years ago, only 2 to 3 windsurfers regularly windsurfed our local beach, now it is beteween 10 and 20 on a given day. Haven spoken to all, about 7 guys have returned to the sport after many years retired, stating got sick of seeing us having so much fun out there, and were motivated to start again. About 4 or 5 have shifted beaches because ours is better than theirs. And about 4 or 5 are newbies.

Apparently this is happening all over australia, as is discussed in australian windsurfing forums. So certainly not a dying sport in Australia!!!!!!!!

Unregistered
17th March 2008, 06:19 AM
Hey you anti and ex-windsurfers don't you have a life to go and live, why do you bother to post on a windsurfing forum if you are finished with it? Maybe you don';t have lives and just wanna cause trouble?

Unregistered
17th March 2008, 07:42 AM
good to see the aussie blokes are hard at it and in numbers !!
look at the aussies when they had the olympics they cleaned house,
a hardcore bunch keep up the stoke people!!

Shredulato

windsurferdagg
17th March 2008, 09:23 AM
I would say the main reason why younger people are not getting into it is because it doesn't seem as flashy as other sports. Jibing is a huge milestone and can be very difficult, but to people outside windsurfing, its just turning around.

Also, I really started to get into windsurfing when I was 17. Before that, I could not drive myself to the beach, and my parents were too busy to drive me. Luckily I have good parents, who helped me buy my first gear. But windsurfing isn't like the other sports. Soccer, hockey, baseball, all these sports the parents can really get involved. It is like babysitting. The typical parent is too busy with work, so the kid cannot go windsurfing. It also does cost more, so a young kid has no hope to start unless his/her parents buy gear.

I think the biggest reason though is the fact that its a lifestyle. I am the only person in my school who windsurfs. Out of over 1000 kids, I am the only one who gets excited when the wind picks up, the only one who runs home, stuffs the car with gear and heads to the beach. Everyone has the perception that windsurfing is full of old guys, pink helmets, duck tape and huge boards with triangle sails. They don't know what windsurfing has become, and therefore have no interest. It is really not something you can plan, at least not here in ottawa, canada, so it takes the extra effort. You either love it or you don't.

And one more thing, if its not easy, most kids are too lazy to take it up and give it a shot. They get bored. I see why people have gone to kiting. I tried it on snow this winter, to see how easy it is... and its so rewarding so fast. 3rd time out I was pulling grabs and one handed jumps..... fast learning curve = more people doing it

My 2 cents,

Thomas

Unregistered
17th March 2008, 09:31 AM
pretty hilarious....and i'm one of 'em!!

http://forums.iwindsurf.com/viewtopic.php?t=12819

pierrec45
17th March 2008, 03:36 PM
> And one more thing, if its not easy, most kids are too lazy to take
> it up and give it a shot. They get bored.

Interesting point of view from a 17yo, and he's right with the above. I've seen many youngsters give it up after less than an hour - "too difficult", "don't like it anymore". The Playstation generation, must be easy and quick.

Ironic: on the old, unstable, 80s boards that made everything way more difficult, everyone could learn, almost easily !!

I also agree with the difficulties he mentions - getting there, no car, etc. When I teach newbies, I personally concentrate on the 20-25yo. But they too are part of the "too difficult" generation.