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wiindz
18th January 2009, 11:52 AM
i have recently looked into buying a used 04 hypersonic 111l wood,but have heards lots of bad stories about the whole wood concept and how thin and fragile these boards are:confused:, so comparitively to say the slalom boards of the 90's stronger weaker, easer/harder to fix???
thanks in advance,
tom

Screamer
18th January 2009, 03:20 PM
Tom
They are not more fragile than other performance slalom boards (which are usually carbon). I've used hyper a lot and now iSonic. I've dinged them here and there, but I think they are actually more resistant than JP and F2, which somehow feel more brittle.

If you're buying second hand, just check the condition, repairs, etc. However 2004 was a long time ago and it may mean a lot of mileage and damage. If it's within your budget, I'd suggest second hand iS111 or 122 (from 2007), because it's: a) newer/less used and b) new generation shape compared to hyper.

wiindz
18th January 2009, 10:22 PM
an isonic would be grand but i have main problems with it A) very hard to find new or used around montreal, and b) i highly doubt ill find something in good shape for $400 haha, so ill have to make due with the hyper for now, but my problem is will it last, assuming that the board is in good shape and has no repairs on it...??

mim
18th January 2009, 10:32 PM
Hi,

I think it will last as any other board or better. But it depends on your skills strongly, if you have a lot of catapults you might destroy the nose...but no worries this will happen on other boards as well!

Ciao M.

Per
18th January 2009, 10:44 PM
I've had lots of wood boards and - except that I've seen a Formula 162 ending up like crap in six months - I've never had any problems with them at all. Only drawback is that a repair is difficult to hide if you ding them in the visible wood part..

;-)
Per

Farlo
19th January 2009, 12:13 AM
Hi Tom, if the board was used since 2004 and is still in good condition you should not expect particular issues. The concern is more the HS itself. Many people loved it; other people found it quite technical to get planning and to gybe. If your experience is mostly with slalom boards of the 90's then you may need some time to adapt.

wiindz
19th January 2009, 12:59 AM
i dont mind adapting to something new, it looks like a great board from what i read and allot of fun, so i think on that matter, the board works for me, but i am still a bit concerned as to the number of repairs i will have to make if i want this board to work for the next 2-4 summers...what do you guys think??

wiindz
19th January 2009, 01:01 AM
I've had lots of wood boards and - except that I've seen a Formula 162 ending up like crap in six months - I've never had any problems with them at all. Only drawback is that a repair is difficult to hide if you ding them in the visible wood part..

;-)
Per

was this board wrecked because of the construction of the board, because i would imagine that the hs should have very similar construction to the formula boards, thin and light, or because it was misused or such?

Per
20th January 2009, 12:19 AM
Hi Wiindz
The board was used for its purpose: racing. This formula board was an exception though. The guy who used it had a F160 before it with no problems. I have a F159 which is in a surprisingly good condition after five years. The 162 I guess was pushed to (beyond) its limits in its lightweight construction. It's very complicated to make a one metre wide and very flat board both light and strong. The HS I guess is another issue.

;-)
Per

BelSkorpio
20th January 2009, 03:14 AM
Last year, I've bought myself a second hand wooden formula 161 of 2007.
The board was well taken care of, and thus in excellent shape.
After 1 year of sailing, I must say that I like it very much.
Amazing how fast it is planing, whith almost no wind. 6-7 knots, 10m2 sail and off I go. My windsurfing hours are easily doubled.
BUT, I also admit a repair of a little hole in the deck. Really don't know how it came there, but it must have been during a mast/boom crash.
In the mean time I've also seen other people sailing wooden formula boards with quite a few "white repair bumps". So I'm not the only one.
Now I really take care, because indeed to my opinion the wooden board is more fragile then other boards. I certainly do not advise the board for beginning windsurfers who still crash a lot. Nevertheless, the board sails fantastic and it's still worth it !
No pain, no gain.