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o2bnme
30th October 2006, 08:54 PM
I learned a lot this weekend. We had what might have been the strongest, most consistent winds, I have ever experienced on my current gear. I weigh in at 145 pounds right now. So, what did I learn?

I learned that an iSonic 105 with a 4.8 Hucker makes a fun combination but won't be the fastest on the water until I figure it out more. I think this is at the limits of what is practical for this size board unless on very flat water.

I sailed it during our club races this weekend, which is always a sobering thing to do for me. The first two heats I used a different board with the same 4.8 sail. I did ok, but felt I would do better if I switched to the iSonic.

The first two heats with the iSonic were very windy. The 4.8 was a good sail for the conditions for me. Heading on tack 1 & 3 on the .6 mile course, I found the iSonic to be blazingly fast. It was super easy to control. I really didn't have to think about much. The best part of it is the off the line acceleration. I found I could jump on and go -- and before I knew it, I was in 1st or 2nd. It was so much better than the other board I was using. I loved the way it jibed around the mark too. I realized that the more aggressive I got, the better it felt. And the accleration out of the jibe was top notch too.

Then came the sobering news for me. The return tacks (3rd & 4th legs of race) were heading into the chop. It was more downwind, but the pounding was too much for me to keep control of the board. I was noticeably slower than some of the other competitors. I just couldn't keep the nose down. I didn't have access to a smaller fin and the mast track was all the way forward already. (I was using a 32cm weed fin.)

With my AHD Convert 60, I managed a 5th and 2nd. With my iSonic, I managed a 2nd and 4th. So, I really didn't improve my standing by switching boards. I'll have to work on how to get this board to perform in high winds.

After lunch, the winds backed off a bit. Competitors went to bigger boards and sails. Sails ranged from 6.4 to 8.0. I was on the 8.0 Retro. I had it downhauled to max, and it worked beautifully. The next three heats I won. Again, the iSonic accelerated from the starting line better than the other competitors. The water had flattened out considerably and I found I was out for a Sunday cruise. I almost lost the first race of the afternoon because I was TOO relaxed. Oops. Lesson learned! The last race I made a mistake at the start, which cost me a good showing there. I couldn't get past the three people in front of me. I should have released some downhaul tension light everyone else. Oops. Lesson learned (again).

I placed 1st, 1st, 1st, 4th for the afternoon heats. I found that if the iSonic got a good start, I didn't have to worry much about the other competitors.

I think the 8.0 Retro is about as large as I'll go on that board. It was a very comfortable combination for me to sail.

The board is just what I was looking for -- a very versatile machine I can use in a wide range of flat water conditions.

Overall, I got 2nd place. The person who got first proved he is the most consistent sailor and racer. Also, he proved he could pick the correct equipment and knew how to keep things in control.

Sorry for the long post. If you read this far and have any advice for how a lightweight can keep things in control during high wind races, I'd love to hear it! I don't see myself getting a new high wind board any time soon.

Ricbra
1st November 2006, 01:36 AM
Hi o2bnme,


Unfortunately I do not have your answers, I??ve sailed my iS105 just a couple of times. However seems to me that weed fins aren't the thing to have on a competition but I know you 've got to go with what you have.

This time I just wanted to know which fin you used with your Retro 8.0

Tnx.

o2bnme
1st November 2006, 01:59 AM
Ha. I have at least 4 fins for each of the boards I own. I keep thinking I have enough and then I realize I don't. ;-) We had tons of sea grass in the waters we were racing in, so weed fins were the most competitive choice. I just wish I had a smaller one for the 4.8.

I used the same fin for the 4.8 as I did for the 8.0. The fin is sized for the larger sail... a Tangent Reaper 32cm Weed Fin. They are excellent fins. I've never sailed a better weed -- one that is more like a regularly shaped slalom foil. They are top notch.

I tried to buy a 26cm weed fin for use with my 4.8 & 5.6 with this board, but they didn't have any in at the moment. If I could have used a smaller fin with the 4.8, I would expect I would have been more competitive (and the board would have behaved better).

Ricbra
1st November 2006, 07:06 PM
o2bnme,


Have you tried to really load on the mast base? I mean more than what you normally do?

IMHO iS105 likes to be powered up and light guys (like me) are better off with that extra load, specially in rough water conditions.
My experience with iS105 is very little and I found it to be so quiet to the point of deceiving the speed perception.

steveC
1st November 2006, 11:37 PM
Hi o2bnme,

Regarding smaller weed fins, I'm very impressed with the asymmetrical Duo Weed fins made by Wolfgang Lessacher. I have a smaller than normal 28cm (Duo Weed 100% carbon 28S) that I bought that's simply a wonderful fin. Also, I have recently acquired a Duo Weed 100% carbon 34cm too, and while I've only had a couple sessions on it in combination with my 8.3 sail, I'm similarly stoked with its great performance.

Lessacher's fins are super resistant to spinout or crabbing when pushed hard to windward, and they're nearly as fast as my Tectonic Goldwing slalom fins. Interestingly, they achieve such solid drive without without the forward offset associated with most other brands (Tangent, True Ames and GSport). You might want to consider looking into them. It's my understanding that Roger Jackson has acquired some of them in the past, so it might be possible for you to try one of his (I know that you met up with him in your area very recently to try the Gemini). In the meantime, you can check out more about Lessacher's fin designs at his website below:

http://www.cameraid.com/Lessacher/

steveC
1st November 2006, 11:38 PM
Hi o2bnme,

Regarding smaller weed fins, I'm very impressed with the asymmetrical Duo Weed fins made by Wolfgang Lessacher. I have a smaller than normal 28cm (Duo Weed 100% carbon 28S) that I bought that's simply a wonderful fin. Also, I have recently acquired a Duo Weed 100% carbon 34cm too, and while I've only had a couple sessions on it in combination with my 8.3 sail, I'm similarly stoked with its great performance.

Lessacher's fins are super resistant to spinout or crabbing when pushed hard to windward, and they're nearly as fast as my Tectonic Goldwing slalom fins. Interestingly, they achieve such solid drive without without the forward offset associated with most other brands (Tangent, True Ames and GSport). You might want to consider looking into them. It's my understanding that Roger Jackson has acquired some of them in the past, so it might be possible for you to try one of his (I know that you met up with him in your area very recently to try the Gemini). In the meantime, you can check out more about Lessacher's fin designs at his website below:

http://www.cameraid.com/Lessacher/

steveC
1st November 2006, 11:39 PM
Hi o2bnme,

Regarding smaller weed fins, I'm very impressed with the asymmetrical Duo Weed fins made by Wolfgang Lessacher. I have a smaller than normal 28cm (Duo Weed 100% carbon 28S) that I bought that's simply a wonderful fin. Also, I have recently acquired a Duo Weed 100% carbon 34cm too, and while I've only had a couple sessions on it in combination with my 8.3 sail, I'm similarly stoked with its great performance.

Lessacher's fins are super resistant to spinout or crabbing when pushed hard to windward, and they're nearly as fast as my Tectonic Goldwing slalom fins. Interestingly, they achieve such solid drive without without the forward offset associated with most other brands (Tangent, True Ames and GSport). You might want to consider looking into them. It's my understanding that Roger Jackson has acquired some of them in the past, so it might be possible for you to try one of his (I know that you met up with him in your area very recently to try the Gemini). In the meantime, you can check out more about Lessacher's fin designs at his website below:

http://www.cameraid.com/Lessacher/

o2bnme
2nd November 2006, 01:30 AM
Roger was showing me a monster asymmetrical fin from Lessacher. We used it on the Gemini.

What size would you recommend for my iSonic 105 and a 4.8 Hucker? I was planning on getting a 26cm Tangent Reaper.

Roger
2nd November 2006, 05:34 AM
Hi Steve C. and o2bnme,
I'm going to try the 28 cm Lessacher in the Isonic 101 first chance I get.
I like the Lessacher "DUO" assymwtrical concept, but I do find that I'd really like some that are "set forward".
He's got them in prototyping, but I don't have any yet to try.
I think a 28-32 cm Duo set forward in the box would be as close to a
good slalom fin as you could possibly find.
I'm having good luck with the Tangent Dynamics Reapers which are set forward, and have a progressive LE rake angle.
We used the big Lessacher on the Gemini because any fin that's set forward interferes with the centerboard.
Hope this helps,

o2bnme
2nd November 2006, 05:49 AM
I was just looking at the Lessacher website. The Cameleon (sp?) fin is very interesting looking. I wish he had more pictures from different angles.

steveC
3rd November 2006, 01:44 AM
Hi o2bnme and Roger,

One of the first opportunities I had to check out Lessacher's fins was through Niehaus' (G331) website.

http://www.surf-fascination.com/stuff/stuff2005.htm

It has been updated significantly to include his present quiver of stuff, but it still has an awesome collection of Lessacher's fins depicited. Some are quite esoteric and very specialized, yet the site offers a great opportunity to get a better look at asymmetric foiling in both the Duo Weed and Chamaleon concepts. These two different concepts of integrating asymmetrical foils are clearly different and most fasinating. Without a doubt, very unique in the business. In any case, I believe it still depicits the same Duo Weed 28S that I have. In fact, it was through Niehaus' site that I saw the fin and had to have it, as the planform shape was so sweet and perfect to my eye. It is my understanding that a regular Duo Weed 28 has significantly more area, especially down towards the tip. Despite the fact that 28S lacks the added area, it's surprisingly stout and powerful. I regularly use it with a 7.0 sail and it's hard to believe that such a svelte shape can track so well, without any spinout.

I should also point out that I have a 24cm Chamaleon too, but I have only used it once. I tried it with the 7.0, and while it tracked very well and was notably quick, I found that when I pushed it real hard into a jibe, it tended to stall (the Duo Weed 28S didn't). In fairness, I think the sail was a little too big for the fin. Yet, if compared with a standard fin with similar area, I couldn't have dreamed of using it with a 7.0 sail. Really, I need to spend some time with this fin with a sail in the 5.5 to 5.7 range, because I feel that the match up would be more balanced. One thing that it hard to see in pictures is how thick and stiff the fin is. Much much thicker than any fin I've ever seen, with absolutely no flex, even at the tip. It is very apparent looking at the Chamaleon that Lessacher is an out-of-the-box thinker and quite a master of shape and form. I find his uniqueness really outstanding and impressive.

Roger, it's interesting that you note that Lessacher is now working on some designs with a forward positioned leading edge. I remember some time ago in a thread with Wardog that they were discussing this, and it appeared that Lessacher clearly showed some curiousity and interest. The fact that Lessacher's weedfins weren't designed to be positioned forward of the finbox initially worried me, but there is something about the asymmetrical foiling and inherent stiffness in his designs that overcomes their overhang. When I got the Duo Weed 34cm fin, I have to admit to being a bit concerned about the significant overhang. However, in use, the fin worked beautifully. In fact, this fin had the lift and drive equivalent to a 20" (50.8cm) True Ames SB Weed, which is truly amazing. But frankly, I really have to be careful with the overhang, as the fairly sharp trailing edge is very exposed off the back of the board.

When you responded recently to my question concerning a match up of a weedfin with the Serenity, I took a look at the 32 or 34cm (I can't remember the exact size) Tangent Reaper you mentioned on their website. The planform appeared very similar in shape and concept to True Ames' weedfins. Do you find that the Tangent Reapers are stronger performers than the True Ames blade-like weedfins? I always felt that the True Ames weedfins didn't drive to windward that well, unless you went huge sizewise to overcome the problem.

Before I signoff for now, I did want to highlight one of True Ames' weedfins that I feel is a real standout. It is the Wave Ramp 9.5" (24.1cm). Actually, it is an older wave fin design that includes super small ramp that is set about 1" forward of the finbox. I find this rather diminutive fin easily outperforms the True Ames blade designs in windward performance, and it offers the great maneuverability of a wave fin. A low aspect planform with a shallow draft gives this fin a lot of versatility in environments where water depth is a notable concern. Also, I find that it cuts through heavy kelp beds with ease, and that's no small feat. Although blade type weedfins tend to shed most weeds pretty well, they do not perform as well through really thick kelp beds, especially at slower speeds. The Wave Ramp is definitely a fin to have in one's quiver. The only thing to watch out for is that real pointy ramp section when storing the fin. Unknowingly kicking it or brushing up against it hard would be a real nasty encounter.

I guess I got carried away with this post. My apologies for its length.

Pupo Alorda
15th November 2006, 08:55 PM
Hi!
What is better slalom board in med-hi wind (6.3 and 7.6) with 80ks,
94 or 101?
I use more the 6.3 and I like to be fast.
The 7.6 is rarely used.
regards
Pupo
:)

Erik Loots
15th November 2006, 09:02 PM
pupo,

I would say Is 94 with no doubt!

Is 101 is a good one but Is 94 will always be faster! If 6.3 is your favo size. Then Is 94 will be your favo board.

I have isonic 105 because I use it 50% of the time with 7.5