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View Full Version : Mistral Naish 8'11 - any experiences?


letik
29th November 2006, 03:27 AM
Recently got Mistral Naish pro 8'11 (273cm 105L). Wanted to know if anybody had any experiences with this board and if it's a keeper?


Stupid question... I have a carve 37cm fin from JP and 8 meter datona sail. The rig is super lite. I'm about 165 pounds. wondering if I can try using it with this board and fin and how would it feel?
Thanks

http://ycc-windsurf.web.cern.ch/ycc-windsurf/Boards/1098_foto6_staand.jpg

steveC
29th November 2006, 08:35 AM
Hi letik,

While I can't talk from experience actually sailing the board, it comes before width started playing an influenial role in shorter boards. Because of its narrower planform, I would really question the viabiltiy of 8.0 sai, even at your weight. My guess of the board's sail size limit is probably 7.0-7.2, and that might be on the generous side. However, sails in the 6.5-6.8 range might be a more suitable conservative upper limit to consider. If I recollect correctly, the board represented Mistral/Naish's largest light wind wave design of the time, but with a rockerline that tended to be bit flatter than a pure wave board to give it some speed and blasting ability. I hope this helps some. Maybe those who spent some time with the board can offer a more specific background about the board.

steveC
29th November 2006, 08:35 AM
Hi letik,

While I can't talk from experience actually sailing the board, it comes before width started playing an influenial role in shorter boards. Because of its narrower planform, I would really question the viabiltiy of 8.0 sai, even at your weight. My guess of the board's sail size limit is probably 7.0-7.2, and that might be on the generous side. However, sails in the 6.5-6.8 range might be a more suitable conservative upper limit to consider. If I recollect correctly, the board represented Mistral/Naish's largest light wind wave design of the time, but with a rockerline that tended to be bit flatter than a pure wave board to give it some speed and blasting ability. I hope this helps some. Maybe those who spent some time with the board can offer a more specific background about the board.

GEM
29th November 2006, 09:55 AM
You can probably squeeze a 7.5 if it's light. Steve is right, though, it's pre-wide style.
Positives: very fast, nice jibing when powered up, good jumping ability.
Negatives: less stable, doesn't tolerate bad footwork, very fragile.
For moderate wind, I really like this board as narrow-style boards go.

I use my 8'7" more as a pure wave board, and in fact the dimensions are similar to an Acid 7x (leaving rocker / rail out of it). I've ridden the 8'7" (which is substantially smaller) with a 6.5 and it's OK but really likes to be more powered up and I prefer riding it in 5.5 - 4.0; never really pushed the upper limit of an 8'11" since it was borrowed. Definitely a 7.0, probably 7.5, I doubt it'll be good with an 8.0.

Another board I really liked of that vintage / series was the Naish Fish. They were all great riders, but light and fragile.

Nathan
1st December 2006, 04:20 AM
Love It, the board was and still is fun to ride
I've still got mine (although it has been repaired a few times ) and use it regularly.

Biggest sail i use is a 6.6 and JP fin 29cm. At the time of release on the market the recommended max sail size was 7.5 minimum sail size 5.0

Nathan

letik
1st December 2006, 11:49 PM
Nathan, thanks! I wonder what will happen if I put my
datona 8.0 (very light rig) on it and let's say 37 cm JP
freeride/carve fin. What's the maximum fin size you can use
with it?
My board is actually almost new and was only used several times
before i got it. The nose worries me if hit with a boom! :)

Thanks

Windman
6th December 2006, 06:32 AM
Goor morning, Letik,

That whole series of boards were produced with a very thin nose and many of them suffered dings and worse. As a suggestion, you might get the longest mast protector available, then fit it upside down, just below the boom. Hopefully its length will cover the nose area that has been a problem.

Would have to say though, that the swing weight of a 7.5/8.0 is pretty high and the board's nose is thin, so........

Hope this helps,

Regards,

Windman

GEM
6th December 2006, 07:24 AM
In fact, I dinged the nose of my board several times, never in a launch, but always when the wind died and schlogging in bobbing water I just fell off and the mast dinged the nose when it hit the board. Afther the 2nd or 3rd time, I bit the bullet and simply reinforced the nose of the board a little. It's so light, I never really notice the added weight. But that's how fragile it is. Very fragile, and I don't think the biggest possible rig is a great idea. I think a 7.0 would be the biggest I'd ride on it.

zots
6th December 2006, 11:09 AM
Try the thing yourself!!!!:p

n1kl05
6th December 2006, 04:42 PM
Hi,
I used to have an 8 11 and liked it but it has some weaknesses.
I have to say that I live in Hungary/Central Europe and mainly used that board on lakes with 2-4 ft high waves/chops and that one was my only board therefore I used it with quite wide sail range (4.7 to 6.7).
Yes, it`s fast and jumps well but got very nervous in overpowered conditions. It carried my largest sail (NP diablo 6.7) pretty ok though I didn`t feel it ideal to this board. I`d recomment to use it with a 6 or so.
The original fin (as far as I remember it was a 27cm Naish FR) is not the best one. Got spin out easily and had very bad upwind ability. I changed it to a bigger Maui FR (31cm) and it was much better and helped the large sail size also.

It is FRAGILE. I managed to crash it`s nose at the first time on the water and had to have it repaired.

I decided to change it to a Kombat 95 and buy a bigger one (120 Xcite) for lighter days. These 2 gives me better coverage on windy days here and have better characteristics.

Laszlo

letik
7th December 2006, 12:26 AM
Just wondering...
Some of you mention nose protector some, good mast
pad. Is it one or the other or is it both?

I'm just thinking that maybe if I have some very soft
thick mast&boom protector maybe the nose protector won't be needed.

Sorry for going in circles, but it's always sad to have a broken board; then spend time on repairs and then have it leak...

Andrey

GEM
7th December 2006, 09:37 AM
I'm sympathetic to that.

I've put an EVA foam pad on one of my boards - a C131 - I'm not really worried about the C131 but I had some friends that were struggling to get in the straps and on (what I viewed as) harder boards to sail and jibe, and I wanted to feel comfortable with loaning out the board. So I put on a nose protector.

In the case of the Naish, as I said it got accidentally dinged a couple of times, and I decided to sand the nose down to the glass (which, BTW, is a single layer of open weave fiber that I would guess to be about 8 oz. cloth) and added some layers of glass / WEST epoxy. Since the mods, I HAVE had some very hard launches (ran aground on a 3.7 day), and the nose is quite solid. I didn't want to make the nose "harder/stiffer" than the rest of the board, so I mainly glassed the rails and faired it into the body a good bit. The Mistral / Naish boards are FRAGILE, because they are made of the ultimately lightest production technology they could muster at the time. The upside is that they are fast as all getout and get HUGE air. Remember, Robby himself said about the 8'7", "The faster you go, the higher you jump". He got that right!

Depending on how you want to use a board, who's going to use it, what the projected conditions are, etc., I think the EVA pad is a logical pick.

Without naming specific devices, there are gizmos that attach to the mast base and are designed to deflect the mast away from the nose. I've never used one of those, because I intend to STEP right where they want me to put this THANG. So I reject all such options.

I myself wouldn't hesitate to get any of the boards in this quiver (in fact I've wanted my buddy to decide to sell me his 8'5" wave). But if I thought it would be vulnerable to nose dings, I'd reinforce the nose a little straight away. It's a good winter project...

GEM
7th December 2006, 09:52 AM
I concede to Zots critique that I have not had a lot of time on the 8'11", but I have ridden all the boards in this line (save the Floater, of which I only studied an acquaintances board), and the whole line are all very similar in feel and construction. If there were ever a production series that felt like they were a "family", the Mistral / Naish series was it.

Also, having sailed them, AND being an admirer of Robby, I think that these boards reward the sailor who sails like Robby - powered all the way through the jibe, hard aggressive carves, sail rigged to be 'back-handy' (which helps get vertical in the jumps). Go for it in this fashion, FULLY powered up, and you'll be richly rewarded on any of the boards in this line. Sail timid, and on this stuff you're gonna get thrashed and break it a lot. If you're gonna sail wimpy, you'll do a LOT better in that case with a Carve. Kombats too, I really like my Kombat.

steveC
8th December 2006, 12:22 AM
Hi Andrey,

Looks like you have had some great input since my original post above. Really, a lot of very positive information, except for the clear indications of the board's inherent fragility. Regarding that, I have to question the addition of EVA foam to the board. While EVA foam would offer a buffer of sorts against boom or mast strikes, it looks so tacky. Despite the old school pointy nose, which still looks good in my book, it would take away from the board's sleek good looks and shape.

If you are truly worried about protecting the nose of the board, I think Geoff's suggestion of reinforcing it with added glass and epoxy makes the most sense. If the job is done right, before the nose has been damaged, it makes the job quite a bit easier and it ensures the best integrity overall. Really, the toughest part is spending the time to carefully fair the added material into the existing shape.

If you lack experience performing repairs, you might want to check out the BoardLady's website below, as it offers an excellent source of information to guide you down the right path. She's a seasoned pro at repairs, so you can readily depend on her instructions and recommendations.

http://www.boardlady.com/repairs.htm