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1st February 2012 04:58 PM
Ken Uphauling with an "easy uphaul" is a no brainer. However, sail size is only one factor with uphauling. While I can uphaul an 11.0 without too much stress in wind under 10 knots, if the wind is over 15, it's a killer.

In my 28 years of windsurfing and racing, twice I had to be rescued because the wind jumped from 10 to 20+ knots as fronts rolled in. Everyone was on big sails and all got flattened. No one could water start or uphaul. This was in the early days of formula and on a longboard some years before that.
1st February 2012 06:49 AM
Jean-Marc Agree on uphauling: keep your back as straight and upright as possible and bent your knees. A home-made "easy uphaul" (a 50-80 cm long rope with 3 loops so you can hook in with your harness) does make the uphauling job a lot easier and nicer to your back.

Cheers !

JM
1st February 2012 02:17 AM
troll
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
I am the thread starter and I recently purchased a used 2006 Formula board. I went with an older board because the tail is narrower than the recent models while still being 100cm wide. I have had 2 sessions on the board with average conditions at my sailing site. (8-10kts no white caps or chop). At my skill level I was able to plane 80-90 percent of the time with the 10.0 sail. I find the formula board not difficult to sail and is much easier to stay upwind with the light onshore wind. Up hauling the 10 is a challenge even using an ez up haul. However, I think the width and volume of the board help make this a little easier. I have completed a few jibes and again I think the volume of the board really helps when I fall off the plane to provide stability when handling the larger sail. So far the formula board has accomplished what I want to do.
That's great - I've also had a lot of satisfaction with my foray into formula. The uphauling does suck, but you learn not to drop your sail pretty fast. For me, the key with uphauling is to do it slowly and use the legs as much as possible. I've been ok using the 11.0 and 12.0.
19th January 2012 03:02 PM
Unregistered I am the thread starter and I recently purchased a used 2006 Formula board. I went with an older board because the tail is narrower than the recent models while still being 100cm wide. I have had 2 sessions on the board with average conditions at my sailing site. (8-10kts no white caps or chop). At my skill level I was able to plane 80-90 percent of the time with the 10.0 sail. I find the formula board not difficult to sail and is much easier to stay upwind with the light onshore wind. Up hauling the 10 is a challenge even using an ez up haul. However, I think the width and volume of the board help make this a little easier. I have completed a few jibes and again I think the volume of the board really helps when I fall off the plane to provide stability when handling the larger sail. So far the formula board has accomplished what I want to do.
17th January 2012 12:54 AM
Pelegrin BelSkorpio - It was not meant for You. It was a replye for saying I did not show anything. I am used to it. There is always windsurfers telling you that wide boards do not work in higher lightwinds. Anyway - the trend is clear - You see more of those wide boards on the water and the reason is that windsurfers want to keep on planing. You can now chose among several wide boards.

Joe_Windsurfer - My friend use a AHD FF about 145 l and we have been freeriding some years together. The SLW plans earlier and goes higher upwind but the top-speed is about the same. In non-planing conditions the AHD is much better upwind. There is some tenique going upwind non-planing with real wide boards.
17th January 2012 12:23 AM
BelSkorpio No reason to get upset.
The title of the unregistered thread initiator of 65kg was "lightweight AND lightwind".
It's the combination of these 2 factors that are important in this thread.

I think it remains an interesting topic.
Does a light weight rider need a Formula or something similar (like US or SLW) ?
Is it the best option ?
My take on this is that he can use it for Formula contests where you really need to sail very sharp, but in other conditions probably there are better options.
16th January 2012 11:01 PM
Pelegrin I thought I tryed to show my experience but as I understand there is always someone who knows better.

I am not sailing off shore. I sail at sea but in an area of about 2 x 1.5 NM sorounded by islands and beleive it or not - the SLW works in 10 m/s with 6.5 or 5.5. If Formula-boards can make it why should not SLW make it? I have done it, it works and I can not see why I have to be told that it does not work?

We are still off the LIGHTWIND-discussion. Perhaps we could make a definition. Is 4-8 m/s better? To plan in 4 m/s you need a Formula-sail to the SLW but between 5 and 8 m/s it works perfect AND You can use sails between 6.5 to 9.0.
16th January 2012 04:51 PM
joe_windsurfer at 100 kilos i have sailed an AHD FF 160/79 cm wide in 10 m/s or about 20 knot winds on the St Lawrence with a 7-oh. It is NOT ideal , but - do-able. Also prefer to go down to a smaller , narrower board in those winds. Chop here is usually not that bad and is why one can do that. { did it once with an 8-oh cambered sail, butt that was crazee}

For me, i have given up trying to use the shortboard on the lake #$%^&*( Any interference from boats and water vehicles is very annoying and difficult. ONLY use the longboard on the lake now - for lulls and traffic "noise" ^&*()
16th January 2012 10:38 AM
COACHG Pelegrin,

You didn't show anything. You wrote down some numbers that we are expected to believe. I sail in the San Francisco Bay & Delta in northern CA, as well as small & large lakes. My point was that it was not possible to sail a 160+ liter freeride board in 10 ms and be great unless you weigh upwards of 90+ kg. To be able to use one board in the conditions you are describing and feel great I would have to be on very flat water.

Today, 8-9 ms on a small lake and I had my hands full with 6.6 & Futura 133. Had to go down to 110 Fanatic Hawk to feel great. If the UCD sailing team wasn't out practicing I probably could have stayed with the 133 but their wakes made it too hard to keep the board down at my weight.

What I'm saying is your JP may work great for you where you sail all the way up to 10 ms as a one board solution, but it is limited to a flat water location such as yours. Those of us that sail in larger bodies of water can not hope to use your JP above 8 ms and feel great, that becomes survival sailing.

Coachg
16th January 2012 12:47 AM
Pelegrin Then we are there again! What was the headline - LIGTHTWIND!

I just showed that it is possible to use one board in different wind conditions. If You have just one 110 or just one 85-96 You will still not be planning in 6-7 m/s. The headline was not about wich board is the best one in 10 m/s. I could pass the question back - How well does Your 110 do in lightwind compered to SLW or Isonic 127? (Forget it. It was a silly question).
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