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22nd December 2008 07:06 PM
jago25_98 What's the definition of Guilty Pleasure?

Me buying a Uli Steamroller, Colapsible Paddle and a dry suit for the princely sum of a months wages (...now the wait for customs and excise...)!
22nd December 2008 03:28 PM
drm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Per View Post
Hi drm and others..
To sort things out a little there are basically three different suits: wet, semidry and dry.. When you say wetsuit don't you think about a semidry, like a 5/3 neoprene with waterproof seamings, but not really dry in the openings? To me a wetsuit is a kind of summer thing where water comes in in different places, but gets heated by the body.
It's true that a neoprene suit will be a little safer if it gets ripped but it's also a lot more vulnerable than a drysuit in traditional fabric. It would take a serious tool to make a hole in mine and to my experience it's just way more comfortable than any neoprene suit I've ever had. Strangey all the kiters I know in Denmark use it but windsurfers tend to stick to neoprene.

;-)
Per
Yes, a semi-dry. But it is still a wetsuit, isn't it?
20th December 2008 03:52 AM
Per It's made for diving where it may be necessary and 70 minutes may be long. In windsurfing 70 minutes may be half a session only, and you just wont need it unless you live near the arctic circle.
Not that I don't appreciate new ideas but I would prefare to spend the cash on good and secure equipment.

;-)
20th December 2008 12:28 AM
Floyd And buy a bigger board to carry battery !
19th December 2008 09:29 PM
jago25_98 Add HBomb to a normal wetsuit:
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ICEBREAKER-HEA...ayphotohosting
19th December 2008 09:18 PM
Per Hi drm and others..
To sort things out a little there are basically three different suits: wet, semidry and dry.. When you say wetsuit don't you think about a semidry, like a 5/3 neoprene with waterproof seamings, but not really dry in the openings? To me a wetsuit is a kind of summer thing where water comes in in different places, but gets heated by the body.
It's true that a neoprene suit will be a little safer if it gets ripped but it's also a lot more vulnerable than a drysuit in traditional fabric. It would take a serious tool to make a hole in mine and to my experience it's just way more comfortable than any neoprene suit I've ever had. Strangey all the kiters I know in Denmark use it but windsurfers tend to stick to neoprene.

;-)
Per
19th December 2008 06:52 PM
raffig Totally agree with rdm, freezing hands are the real limiting factor, even if you wear the best wetsuit/drysuit.

Re: batteries - this reminds me North Face when they realeased some years ago the first battery-operated mountaineering jackets. I am afraid that they were not very successful market wise, and I am sure that the Himalayan expeditions need more serious stuff than batteries.

Rafa
19th December 2008 03:21 PM
drm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
I am sorry but that is all wrong. Have you already tried one ?

The Drysuit offer much more protection against cold than a wetsuit. In fact you are totally isolated from the outside (zero water, zero windchill). You are so much isolated that you can easily get too warm, even when the water is +5C and the air +5C or below.

In countrys like canada, danemark, sweden etc ... they only use that.

Your body is not wasting energy to warm up the water layer which is between your skin and the suit like in a wetsuit. This water layer has to be warmed up again and again and again ...

In top of that the Drysuit is much more flexible than the drysuit if you choose the correct size, just try one ...
I am from Sweden. Most people (nearly all) who sail here in winter here use wetsuits. Instead, we tend to try to add a layer or two underneath. Very effective. Any dry-suit used will be neoprene as well, because if you rip it will still keep you reasonably warm.

When sailing in winter the main (only) problem is keeping the hands warm and avoiding muscle cramp, that is what limits sailing time. Not the wetsuit.

A good, flexible wetsuit for winter-sailing with a proper fit lets very little, if any, water in so I have not experienced that the water layer "has to be warmed up again and again and again...". You need a proper rinsing in the waves for that to happen. After that, it is time to take a short break and regain som energy anyway.
18th December 2008 07:43 PM
jago25_98 re: Dry Suits:

If I was commited to lie-down surfing I'd consider the HBomb if it was half the price, or if I was richer.

As it stands I really apprieciate what Per said about his surfing off Denmark (it seemed roughly the same temp as Scotland when I was in Hansthrom) To me it seems, if doing stand up, or windsurfing in colder conditions then a good fit, quality Dry Suit is for me.

The next thing is, I know nothing about dry suits, even though I work on survey boats.

We use overalls and have to scramble for immersion suits in abandon ship drills. These things are awfully unwieldy; the hands are sealed like Mr. Blobby and the feat cause trip ups. I wonder if we should be working in Dry Suits on deck or whether that would be unwieldy.

But I do know that survival time in the North Sea is less than 5mins with average clothes, which is at least 10mins less than the time for rescue. What this all means is that the side of the boat might as well be a vat of acid.

I already have to carry 20kg of boots, overalls and jackets on the plane to each job. I wonder, could this actually be reduced by a dry suit? If so, I could justify a 1000 purchase. In fact, if it's work related I'm prepared to spend much more.

Compare this to spending 500 in order to sail/paddle/surf in the winter and it seems like a lot. Can I combine the 2 uses? What do Fishermen use for thier safety?

re: Suits:
I would like to see "Dave Graneys 'suit of the future'"
The HBomb suits used in the tests I would expect to be bespoke. I'm not sure people really remember this sort of thing; people want the cheap off the rail suits - more profit here than Snugg's bespoke 300ish suits in Newquay. A proper fit makes all the difference.

re: Batteries. I think this is more something for the surfer, because for a duck-diving surfer a dry suit is not much of an option. However, the issue of batteries running out due to user error is very important. So important that some say the product shouldn't exist. But only some people say that. If it's a well known beach break I'd love to use it, certainly if there's a support boat.

re: Hoods.
Can I just say something about hoods! They make a big difference on being warm, but can we get one that allows me to breath after being held down! One nearly killed me! Can't we get something where the chinstrap goes on the jaw/chin rather than the throat!?

Love the pics nonopr :-)

Some tips from me:
I wore my thermal underwear underneeth my suit the other day (cotton bottoms, stretch top). Seemed to help. Worth a go. Also could be worth trying: Plastic bags on feet. Also, food eaten before hand very important. Long chain carbs is what you want; Porridge oats.
The Taoist who was brought in for Russian astronaughts wore a T-Shirt in -20 to the launch. It centres around breathing. But does it work, and does it work for surfing?
17th December 2008 11:08 PM
nonopr
TEst in -10 Celcius outside. Sorry.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unregistered View Post
Ocean Water: Temperature
The ocean has a wide range of temperatures from the almost 100F (38C) shallow coastal waters of the tropics to the nearly freezing waters of the poles.

The freezing point of seawater is about 28.4F (-2C), instead of the 32F (0C) freezing point of ordinary water. Why do you think the freezing points are different? Right, because seawater has salt in it! As seawater increases 5 ppt in salinity, the freezing point decreases by 0.5F.


From "Ocean Talk" by Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command



How did Nonpor test suit in -10 degrees ?

Sorry, I forgot that point not water but air temp at the time of test.. Here are some great pictures of the trip.




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