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31st August 2009 10:20 PM
PG Yes, you need a 5.7-6.0 freeride (or FreeMove/ PowerWave) sail. Start looking for one (and a suitable mast, if you don't have one)!
31st August 2009 02:04 PM
Marko CRO169
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken View Post
Marko,

Interesting chart, but the top end range of the sails, particularly for the intermediate and amateur sailors is very high and frankly, WAY OVER reasonable limits for an 80kg sailor. A 5.8 sail with a top end of 35 knots for an amateur? 41 knots for a 5.0? I don't think so!

The Neil Pryde amateur sailors must all be PWA members racing the slalom circuit. They are over selling the range of their sails. I suppose the top end numbers could be true if you consider a few select speed sailing sites around the world with very flat water and very small boards, but even an 80kg amateur speed sailor would have a handful with a 5.0 in 41 knots of wind, and an intermediate with a 5.0 in 47 knots. Give me a break!
I agree with your comments, this is exactly why I said "orientation", namely, according to my experience the low-ends of these ranges are more or less ok and make a good reference, it is the upper-ends that are "overstretched", of course unless you are Antoine blasting down the "Canal" at Ste-Maries-de-la-Mer!
31st August 2009 01:40 AM
steveC The jump from 4.9 to 7.0 is a bit too great. Personally, I use the following sails; 4.2, 5.0, 5.7, 7.1 and 8.3. Based on my experience, I think you would be wise to consider an added sail in the 5.7-6.0 range, but I would also say that the no cam route is best for you right now. Later, when your skills evolve sufficiently to warrant a move to either 3 cambered freeride or race sails, you'll be better poised to take advantage of a racer kit, including the requisite board and fins to optimize things.
30th August 2009 09:11 PM
Unregistered So continue with camless sails until fully powered or overpowered and jybing is the best for now. What size sail then i am 80kgs 180lbs, have a 137L board and 2 sails
I have a 7m severne gator and a 4.9m np supersonic. Could I make it with these sails or is another sail best. I was thinking about trying to use the gator untill about 22 knts and then the 4.9 after that. That way I can be overpowered when the winds and seas are smaller and then under powered once things get a little rougher. Would that make sense or would a middle sail really help me learn jybes and technique?
30th August 2009 03:42 PM
Egor I agree with above and wouldnt get a race sail until your at advanced level
30th August 2009 02:58 PM
Unregistered Race sails are very specialized tools, and not usefull unless you are
- competing in slalom
- very experienced, and skilled
- are willing to buy the top of the range (i.e. expensive) mast for the sail

You have speedwise already maxed out the capabilities of good freeride sails, and you are most probably the fastest at your beach already.

You would use the 6 m2 race sail in winds where everyone else is enjoying themselves on 4.5 - 5.0 sails (and at your stage in the learning curve a smaller sail that is still powerful enough for comfortable planing is the ticket to progress).

For us others good freeride and freerace sails make much more sense, even in big sizes.

My take is that the handling advantage of a camless freeride sail in a 6.0 size well equalizes the potential higher performance of a cam sail. In bigger sizes, above 7.0 cams may be worthwhile. Cam sails typically feel a litte stiffer, like holding on to a wall, while camless sails are more like a dancing partner.

And to hone your jybing skills camless is certainly the way to go.
29th August 2009 01:24 AM
Ken Marko,

Interesting chart, but the top end range of the sails, particularly for the intermediate and amateur sailors is very high and frankly, WAY OVER reasonable limits for an 80kg sailor. A 5.8 sail with a top end of 35 knots for an amateur? 41 knots for a 5.0? I don't think so!

The Neil Pryde amateur sailors must all be PWA members racing the slalom circuit. They are over selling the range of their sails. I suppose the top end numbers could be true if you consider a few select speed sailing sites around the world with very flat water and very small boards, but even an 80kg amateur speed sailor would have a handful with a 5.0 in 41 knots of wind, and an intermediate with a 5.0 in 47 knots. Give me a break!
28th August 2009 10:32 PM
Marko CRO169 have a look at this chart NP used to have regarding their RS6 sails ... it gives at least a good orientation ... http://rs6.neilpryde.com/content/view/58/81/
28th August 2009 10:25 PM
Unregistered yeah thanks for the advice that makes it clear.
28th August 2009 10:11 PM
Ken In my opinion, cam sails have a fixed foil shape that remains pretty stable regardless of the wind. The center of force doesn't move around as much as no cam sail, which equals better control. I think this makes a difference, especially with larger sails (6.5 - 12.5). Also, the cam sails tend to have looser leaches with more twist at the top, which also helps with stability in gusty conditions. Once below 6.5, the need or benefits of a camed sail are greatly reduced. Some sail manufactures (Maui Sails) make 4 cam race sails (TR-5) down to 4.3. However, I doubt many are buying the smaller sizes other than the PWA slalom racers that may have to race in 35 knots. Even in those conditions, they use larger sails (5-7m). I think a no cam sail is easier to jibe, but it may give up a little bit in power coming out of the jibe. Regardless, I think a no cam sail is best below 6.5 in size.

There are many, many excellent no cam sails below 6.0m. I think you would be better off with one of them and they will be less expensive.

The jump from a 137L to a 90L board for you is pretty big. It's doable, but it may be pretty frustrating. I weigh 79 kg and you will find that uphauling a 90L board will be very, very difficult, which means that you must have your water starts perfected before getting on the smaller board. Same with jibes or you will be water starting on every jibe with the smaller board. Finding a board around 105 - 115 liters would be the best size to transition to your smaller board. You can uphaul a 105L board with some care. It won't sink if you have your feet in the right place, but a couple of inches off and one end or the other will sink. Wave action will also make it more challenging to uphaul.

The 90L board will need a solid 15 - 22 knots of wind to be fun with a sail around 6.0m. Your 4.9 sail will be fine in 20-25 knots on the 90L board. A 5.8 sail or still better, a 6.0 would be a good fit between your sails.

Hope this helps.
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