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-   -   Uphauling a 10 m sail on shortboard (iSonic 133) (http://www.star-board-windsurfing.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1555)

ThierryP 4th April 2007 06:56 PM

Uphauling a 10 m sail on shortboard (iSonic 133)
 
I was seriously considering buying a large slalom board (iSonic 133) to replace my Formula 155.
However, today I was sailing my iSonic 115 on a 7.5 m sail, when the wind died. I managed to schlog, but when I fell in, I did not manage to uphaul the sail: my balance is not good enough, and I was not even close to succeeding (i am 78 kgs). I had to waterstart; waterstarting is no problem with a 7.5 (except the wind was VERY light), but it is a real challenge with a 10 m when the board is so short that you cannot rest the boom on the tail. Now, I come to really value the length of the old F155 (270 cm)!
The iSonic 133 is wider than my 115 (80 cm vs 68 cm), but it is even shorter (222 cm vs 233 cm). I have serious doubts that I would be able to uphaul a 10 m sail on it, if I can't uphaul a 7.5 on the 115. I can't test the board before buying it.
What do you think? If I cannot uphaul a 7.5 on an iSonic 115, do I stand a chance to uphaul a 10 m on an iSonic 133? And do you normally uphaul, or waterstart, a 10 m on a board that's only 220/230 cm?
Cheers!
Thierry

MA_Pete 5th April 2007 02:40 AM

RE: Uphauling a 10 m sail on shortboard (iSonic 133)
 
Uphauling an 8.5 is no problem on the iSonic 125, quite easy actually. I imagine uphauling a 10.0 on a 133 would be just as easy.

My biggest is 9.5, and I never try to waterstart that beast. 7.5 and below for waterstarts for me. I do beachstart it in waist-high or below. I use the Epic deluxe uphaul, that thing rocks for the big sails.

Adjusting to the shorter length (mine is 231 cm I believe) takes a little getting used to, both for uphauling and for tacking, but once you get used to it, no problems. And I am not that advanced either, so if I can do it, anyone can...

Phill104 5th April 2007 03:50 AM

RE: Uphauling a 10 m sail on shortboard (iSonic 133)
 
I weigh 85kg ish and have no problems uphauling an 8.5 on my iS115. You do need to be quick though and really snap it up.

Go out and practise on a very light wind Day when you would not normally sail and you will soon get the hang of it.

mark h 5th April 2007 06:07 AM

RE: Uphauling a 10 m sail on shortboard (iSonic 133)
 
Hi Thierry
Phil and Pete are spot on, I'm 105kg and can uphaul a 9m "wide sleeve" race sail on my sonic 125 in all conditions with out any prob, and I'm average Joe. 10m & 78kg on a iS133 should'nt be hard. I prefere to water-start, but if I fall on the wrong side, its quicker/easier to hop on and uphaul. As Phil says, snap the sail up and spead your foot, should be good.

Cheers

o2bnme 5th April 2007 07:24 AM

RE: Uphauling a 10 m sail on shortboard (iSonic 133)
 
If you are unstable, remember to put slightly more weight on the leeward side of the board. That gets the board to push against the mast and stabilize things for you. Just be ready to adjust when the sail is lifted.

Roger 5th April 2007 08:57 AM

RE: Uphauling a 10 m sail on shortboard (iSonic 133)
 
Hi Thierry P,
I think youi are probably not finding the fore and aft center of buoyancy on your Isonic 133.
You need to put your front foot very close in front of the mast foot, and your rear foot quite a ways behind the mast foot.
In other words you need to shift your weight away from the nose of the board to put the center of your weight over the center of bouyancy
of the board, which is quite a bit further back from the nose than what you may be accustomed to.
The Isonics don't have much volume (float) in the nose and the nose is very short as well, so you simply must move your weight back some.
Hope this helps,

ThierryP 5th April 2007 11:41 AM

RE: Uphauling a 10 m sail on shortboard (iSonic 133)
 
Quote:

o2bnme wrote:
If you are unstable, remember to put slightly more weight on the leeward side of the board. That gets the board to push against the mast and stabilize things for you. Just be ready to adjust when the sail is lifted.
Many thanks for your advice guys, it's all very useful. O2bnme, did you mean "windward" side, rather than "leeward" side? When uphauling, the board is windward, the sail is leeward, if I want the board to push against the mast, I should put more weight on the windward side, isn't it?

James 6th April 2007 12:18 AM

RE: Uphauling a 10 m sail on shortboard (iSonic 133)
 
I think it's harder than some of these guys are implying, but you will probably be able to do it with some practice.

I would say that if a board has at least 50 liters more volume than your weight in kg, you will be able to uphaul it pretty easily. (For you that would be a 128 liter board). And with practice, you should be able to uphaul a board with just 20-30 liters more volume than your body weight in kg. (For you that would be 105 liters). Anything less than that and you will have to be extremely skilled to uphaul.

Jean-Marc 6th April 2007 03:59 AM

RE: Uphauling a 10 m sail on shortboard (iSonic 133)
 
Agree with Roger, the nose is pretty small volume wise. The trick to avoid going submarine is to use 40% of your body weight on your front leg and 60% on your back leg when uphauling a large sail on iSonic/Hypersonic "no nose" hulls.

Cheers !

JM

Roger 6th April 2007 04:10 AM

RE: Uphauling a 10 m sail on shortboard (iSonic 133)
 
Thanks JM!
Yeah, when you get on the Isonic/Hypersonic/Apollo, the lack of "float" really becomes apparent.
I guess alot of sailors still revert back to their beginner days when uphauling.
Gotta space those feet equally if front of and behind the mast foot.
Doesn't work on the "no float nose boards".
Not sure if it's 40% front and 60% back or not, but each sailor must "adjust" their "uphauling stance" to get their weight over the point of max float in the board.
I think I used to put both feet behind the mast when trying to figure out the Hypersonics.
It's awkward, but it works.
Better to put the front foot right back with the inside of your arch practically touching the mast foot, then adjust the width of your stance with your back foot until the board floats level.
Uphauling a board with the nose down (or up) just isn't stable.
Somewhere in your foot placement you can find the "balance point" even if the board is ankle deep in water. (Semi-Sinker)
Hope this helps,


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