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-   -   Kitesurfing less demanding re physical strength? (http://www.star-board-windsurfing.com/forum/showthread.php?t=2312)

Andy1234 24th July 2007 07:17 PM

Kitesurfing less demanding re physical strength?
 
Hi

Sorry, I have no clou about kitesurfing. Anybody here who can compare with windsurfing?

A good friend of mine - a small and lightweigth lady - didn't have such a successful introduction into windsurfing. She told me, that she was not strong enough. Later she attended kitesurfing lessons - and she told me, that kitesurfing was much less demanding regarding physical strength. Could anybody confirm this?

Thanks for your feedback.

Andy

Ellen Faller 17th August 2007 12:03 AM

Hi,
I can't speak to kitesurfing, but getting started in windsurfing does not demand physical strength if you begin with good technique. Most beginners try to push and pull and work against the rig, and therefore make it a struggle. Using the legs, and keeping the sail balanced are the solution to the struggle. Unfortunately, it seems to be human instinct to do it the hard way. Another problem is that some people try to learn with heavy wave rigs, rather than light and easy trainer rigs. Just because the sail is small, does not mean that it is light by any means!
In observing kitesurfers learning their sport, I can see how the lift of the kite might make it feel that it involves less strength.
hope this helps,
Ellen

engelchen 20th August 2007 07:54 PM

Hi Andy,

last year I started windsurfing and my boyfriend started with kitesurfing - so I think I can compare. (Sorry, my english is not the best).

I'm a "small and lightweight lady" myself and I started windsurfing at age of 40 (!). Of course it is hard, but I agree with Ellen that the way HOW you do it and the equipment is important. Also I think a good teacher who shows and explains the steps of a movement has great influence on sucess.
Once you know how to use a harness, I think kitesurfing and windsurfing need about the same physical strength.

When you learn kitesurfing you learn faster I think, windsurfing takes more time to learn. On the other hand a kite is much more dangerous (for the kiter and the others around). If a kite comes down uncontrolled it can hurt badly, also when the wind is too strong and pulls the kiter across the beach.

Hope that helps,
Engelchen

Ellen Faller 20th August 2007 10:51 PM

Hello Engelchen
Your reply was very well written! and a valuable view on the topic too. Many thanks, and I'm sure it will help others.
Ellen

Andy1234 5th September 2007 11:35 PM

physical strength windsurf vs kitsurf
 
Hi Ellen, guten Abend Engelchen

Thanks for your reply, which was very helpful. It confirms what I thought - but without kitesurf experience I wasn't sure.

I'll talk to that friend again - maybe she gives windsurfing a second chance. (But I won't force her).

Regards, Andy

Ellen Faller 6th September 2007 04:48 AM

Guten Tag Andy
I hope your friend will give windsurfing a second chance, but I agree - don't force her. That would nearly guarantee that she would not like it. Girls are like that1 :-)

agrelon 4th March 2010 03:23 PM

From what I've heard not only is kiting easier to learn but also less physically demanding. This is because once in the harness in kitesurfing you basically only need to trim your kite which requires very little effort. In windsurfing you need to can for gusts/lulls and trim the sail.

Also, I think in good conditions it is very unlikely that the kite should fall in the water, unlike a windsurf which requires consistent tacking and jibing skills to keep going. If you don't have these skills, uphauling/waterstarting can be tiring and time consuming. In this way kitesurfing might be less tiring.

I'm not sure about the effort/strength needed in legs for kiteboarding, though. Certainly in windsurfing when sailing powered up a great deal of effort is put into keeping the board under control using legs/knees.

I think that overall kiteboarding is probably less tiring and easier to pickup, though potentially more dangerous.

Roger 5th March 2010 09:37 AM

Hi agrelon,
Interesting discussion here.....
Have you ever done kite surfing?
When youi say that once the kite is up and flying, it is unlikely that the kite should fall in the water, have you ever noticed how often the kites come crashing down and must be relaunched to restart.
Have you ever seen one of the modern "self launching" kites continually crash and then relaunch, tea bagging or dragging the newbie kiter downwind until they either let go of the bar (if they can) or cut/release the lines off one side of the bar so the kite will stop relaunching and dragging them.
On a kite board, it usually takes 2 people to get the kite up and flying (this may have changed recently with the newer kites) but in order to launch a kite safely on a crowded beach it will always require two people.
OK, now the kite is up there and stalled.
As soon as you pull the bar and add some power, you are off. If you picked too large a kite for the conditions, what can you do? Pull the chicken loop and depower the kite....
yeah, and if the chicken loop does not dump enough power, what then?
As far as not tacking and jibing, the kite boarders tack and jibe just as often as the windsurfer, and they must pay constant attention to the kite to keep it flying, without having it take the control away from them.
Think of the amount of leg strain to "edge" a kiteboard to go upwind?
I agree with Ellen.
If you pick a good instructor, with top of the line, lightweight, training gear, in begnner friendly conditions, I see no reason why learning to windsurf should be any more physically demanding than learning to kiteboard.
But the same can probably be said for kiteboarding. Good instructor, the right sort of training gear, and the right kind of conditions, and kiteboarding can probably be just as safe and use about the same amount of energy.
You do get alot wetter though!
Roger

agrelon 6th March 2010 10:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Roger (Post 39310)
Hi agrelon,
Interesting discussion here.....
Have you ever done kite surfing?
When youi say that once the kite is up and flying, it is unlikely that the kite should fall in the water, have you ever noticed how often the kites come crashing down and must be relaunched to restart.
Have you ever seen one of the modern "self launching" kites continually crash and then relaunch, tea bagging or dragging the newbie kiter downwind until they either let go of the bar (if they can) or cut/release the lines off one side of the bar so the kite will stop relaunching and dragging them.
On a kite board, it usually takes 2 people to get the kite up and flying (this may have changed recently with the newer kites) but in order to launch a kite safely on a crowded beach it will always require two people.
OK, now the kite is up there and stalled.
As soon as you pull the bar and add some power, you are off. If you picked too large a kite for the conditions, what can you do? Pull the chicken loop and depower the kite....
yeah, and if the chicken loop does not dump enough power, what then?
As far as not tacking and jibing, the kite boarders tack and jibe just as often as the windsurfer, and they must pay constant attention to the kite to keep it flying, without having it take the control away from them.
Think of the amount of leg strain to "edge" a kiteboard to go upwind?
I agree with Ellen.
If you pick a good instructor, with top of the line, lightweight, training gear, in begnner friendly conditions, I see no reason why learning to windsurf should be any more physically demanding than learning to kiteboard.
But the same can probably be said for kiteboarding. Good instructor, the right sort of training gear, and the right kind of conditions, and kiteboarding can probably be just as safe and use about the same amount of energy.
You do get alot wetter though!
Roger

Indeed I've never kitesurfed but I'm going on trip with a friend who's going to start in 2 months. He'll be able to tell me first hand whether or not it's tough!

I said that kites generally dont fall in the water as often as windsurfing sails because the last I was at a kite/windsurf beach there were generally many more windsurfers waterstarting than kiteboarders trying to relaunch.

I know that I would never start kiteboarding simply because of the space/safe conditions required. With a windsurfer as long as you've got a decent wind angle and a somewhere to beachstart/land on you're pretty much good to go. The thought of the wind dropping and not being able to relauch a kite is enough to put me off kiteboarding.


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