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-   -   Apollo some feedback (http://www.star-board-windsurfing.com/forum/showthread.php?t=2481)

Crash 16th August 2007 06:05 AM

Apollo some feedback
 
I just wanted to give some feedback on the Apollo. Having read a number of reviews mostly from racers I would like to say what a stunning board it is. I'm only a beginner OK I'm getting into foot straps and planing OK but after just two years windsurfing there is still a lot to learn.
My largest sail at the moment is a 7.8 Tushingham Lightening, with marginal wind its just possible to get going with the stock 75cm but as soon as the wind picks up 12 mph + its a pig. Change down to a 68cm fin and the board is a dream better even than my F Type 148 but there are still issues as the wind gets up 15-20 mph my guess a change down in fin size would keep everything in trim. The board seems fast and highly controllable but lifting in gusts again with only a 7.8m sail a drop down in fin size will sort it?
Just had two of my best sessions ever zapping up and down on Carsington Water.
Has the Apollo been dropped? It does not appear in the board line up. Tragic if it has.

Roger 16th August 2007 07:32 AM

Hi Crash,
No, the Apollo Project has not been dropped, it's been improved.
Look under the Formula board link and the new improved (I think Remi Vila
worked on this quite a bit over the past year) Apollo is there.
http://www.star-board.com/2008/pages.../v_formula.php
Hope this helps,

Krister 17th August 2007 04:35 AM

A 7.8 sail is quite small for such a big board. I haven't used anything smaller than 10.0 on the Apollo so far. I think it works really well together with Deb R17S-- RF8. Good speed and angles, gives a much quicker feeling than e.g. a Drake R19. As long as the water is not to rough it is no problem in winds of around 20 knots. In rough sea state I have also used R13S RF8 which is more forgiving. Boomheight and mastbase position is of course very important for finding the correct lift in the nose, so don't be afraid of changing these settings a lot as the wind picks up.

Joe 17th August 2007 08:29 AM

Does the apollo plan earlier than a formula board with your 10.0 or any other sail?

How early can you plan it with the 75cm fin?

I have actually heard very little real world info on this board.

Thanks

Krister 17th August 2007 09:17 PM

I think that it is very hard to give a good description of the wind strength. Measuring on the beach is not going to be representative for the strentgh of the wind a bit later out on the water. Also I often fell I can plane 1 knot earlier on port tack, as compare to starboard, so technique is clearly important (on port tack the righthand arm and leg are used the most so that is probably the reason).

I do think that the Apollo is easier to get going than a regular formula. This is due to the longer rocker flat which makes the planing treshhold more gradual, while the larger fin also gives a lot of sideways resistance to push agains, the larger lift also maintains the planning better. There is less need to bear of and pump/pop the board onto the plane like one has to do on a regular formula with a smaller fin. This is perhaps less of a problem for high skill formula sailors, but for the rest it all helps to get going early. For people who want to enjoi early planing without to much hassle I think the Apollo is a good choice.

Crash 18th August 2007 03:53 AM

Hi Krister its good find someone who has more experience of the Apollo than me. Ive a 9.7 Point 7 AC-2 on order so was interested in your fin selection. Do you stick to a 75cm fin or do you go down in size as the wind gets up? The stock fin seems far from ideal as usual so your comments are really helpful. Looks like Ill have to save up for a quiver of fins as well as sails they make a huge difference with these wide boards.

Joe 18th August 2007 04:08 AM

OK - has anybody raced an Apollo or seen it in a race (formula or against boats)?

I have a ff158 with a 10.4 nx3 (which I think is a great board) but in my future for light wind should I look at a:
- apollo
- 162
- serenity

Not racing - just lightwind cruising on not totally flat water.

Crash 18th August 2007 06:04 AM

Raced the safety boat and beat it.

Krister 18th August 2007 06:11 AM

I have been using the Apollo for racing so I tend to not use the 75 cm fin anymore since I need to find a good tuning with a 70 cm fin. For me the biggest difference when changing down in fin size is that one has to move the mastbase backwards a lot, I'm now at the very back or at +1" (and using the boom at eye level).
For marginal winds and 11.0 I've been using a Drake R19. This fin gives a lot of lift and is great for going upwind, it is slow but points very well and it is also very forgiving, one can go really slow (even down to about 12 knots) and just outpoint others. The fin feels a bit slow on the downwind though so it is important to have the mastbase well to the back. For a bit quicker feeling the Deb. R17S- RF8 is much nicer but it is a bit demanding when going upwind, it needs speed first and then one can point, downwind it is a breeze though. I've done 26 knots with a 10.0 sail without really trying to go fast. I'm light weight (about 68kg) so the board is quite a handfull in waves and strong winds but in lightwind racing I have done much better this year in national races (as compared to last year on a 158).

I haven't tried the 162 (yet) but I did try the 161 before deciding to get the Apollo. To me the Apollo is a bit more like a regular board, just sheet in and go. The 161 feels a bit more specialized (harder on the legs downwind and more extreme strap positions) and aming at racing only (no surprize of coarse) so I think the Apollo is a good choice for light wind recreational use and it doesn't need the very large sails to get going. With a 10.0 sail and the 75cm fin it is actually quite competitive with others on 11.0 and the 161, so there is little need for the very large sails if one is not compeeting. The serenity has a very different use and I haven't had a chance to try it.

Crash 18th August 2007 09:26 PM

Thats my own experience Krister with the board having so little resistance to getting going there is very little pressure on the legs and its very easy to control gusts. Its interesting that you only weigh 68 Kg and are holding down a 10-11 meter sail OK. I was using my mast foot position right back but in the gusts it was lifting but I reckon a smaller fin would suit my 7.8? As a recreational sailor only at the moment I rate the board highly but Ive only been on my F Type 148 to compare.


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