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Old 23rd October 2007, 07:55 AM   #11
James
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Ok, here we go. Northwave sails in the Gorge makes sails down to 2.3.

http://northwavesails.com/sails/surf_rigging.html
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Old 23rd October 2007, 09:16 PM   #12
John Hibbard
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Hi Jean Marc,

Tushingham have just started to produce their Rock wave sails in 2.7m size!! tushingham.com

John
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Old 23rd October 2007, 10:17 PM   #13
Jean-Marc
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James,

Thanks a lot. 2.5 and 2.8 sizes are good match indeed to what I'm looking for. Too bad they're rigged on a 340 cm mast, however (I'd rather prefer a shorter & softer 310 cm mast for my 65 kg*).

John,

Thanks. Any specs for the 2.7 size yet (luff & boom lenght; 4 or 5 battens) ?

Cheers !

JM

(*) Haiko, I've tried to gain 5 kg during the winter break but as soon as I'm back windsurfing again, it's all gone unfortunately...
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Old 24th October 2007, 01:57 AM   #14
John Hibbard
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Hi JM

The 2.7 has 4 battens Luff is 316cm and boom is 140. They will take a 340cm mast and unless you go custom i'm not sure you will find a mast shorter (I maybe wrong)

The Tushingham 340cm mast is 14imcs.

Cheers
John
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Old 24th October 2007, 02:19 AM   #15
Floyd
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Dont want to be a cynic here but F10 ??? Perhaps I`m a bit of a wimp but 55 to 65 MPH is totally unsailable for me.Once got caught out in a yacht in a F10 the sea looked like snow and had spindrift to a depth of at least a foot !(You can drown in the spray in a F10)
A 3.5 works for me in 35 knots (easily)A f10 is about 50 knots.50 knots contains just about double the energy of 35.
By that reckoning I`d need a 1.75 sail.Reckon my body is about that !!!
Any piks of these F10 days ???
Theres windy and there is F10 .If its F10 stay at home.
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Old 24th October 2007, 05:10 AM   #16
Jean-Marc
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Floyd,

I do share your concerns: a 3.0 sail is way too big a sail for such wind force. However, water surface is not a problem anymore because it's not open ocean; it's a lake and gale force winds tend to flatten the swell/waves quite a bit. Some pictures with 10 Bft (recorded 90-100 km/h wind speed) on lake Geneva last November :
http://www.music-roman.com/Photos/Lac_1g.JPG
http://www.music-roman.com/Photos/Lac_6.JPG

Cheers !

JM
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Old 24th October 2007, 08:00 PM   #17
Floyd
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Hi
I`ve been doing a bit of research around forces and windstrength.
In 20 mph (a good sailing day perhaps a 6 or 7 metre) the perpendicular force on any thing in the breeze is around 10kg per square metre.We are handling forces of order (or upto a max ) 60 or 70kg.

At what I see as my limit (ie 40 mph) the loading has gone upto 38kg per metre. Assuming I handle a 3.5 max loading is in order of (or upto max ) 130kg.(plus forces on rest of equipment and me).

In a F10 (Around 60mph) the loading per square metre is now 83kg per metre and everything is happening 3 times as fast as first example.To keep forces similar to those used in 20mph you`d need under a 1 square metre !!! Even to feel like a 3.5 in 40 mph(which is pretty hairy to say least) you would still need under (well under) a 2 square metre. And you are now approaching roughly the surface area presented to wind by your body.Upwind would be impossible. (ie drag to lift ratio gets worse and worse as sail size approaches body size)


Think we should be bit careful about claims of what we can sail in.Somebody might try !

Take care.(Have a rest day when its F10)

(Figures from met office)

Good sailing.
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Old 24th October 2007, 08:38 PM   #18
Ola_H
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Hey JM, the condition in that second image look pretty gnarly.

Personally, I've sailed few times in up to 25m/s gusts, that is around 55mph with 3.5, but its always difficult to know how the wind speed recordings relate to actual wind speed where one sail. One problem in that much wind is that itäs pretty much impossible to retrieve your gear if you loose it in a fall, but sailing close but the shore on a lake should negate tha dangerns of that.


Anyway, maybe its not so constructive to discuss what wind strengths is or s not possible to sail in since the relevant thing in this thread (unless you're breaking a record) is that if o find a sail that works when your 3.0 is to small.

In januari we had a big storm in Sweden, gust at 42.8 m/s which is over 90mph was recorded and a few people where out sailing in over 30m/s (>67mph). A few shots made it around the globe, for example the one below of Henrik Fahlen sailing a 2.2 Naish kids sail

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Old 25th October 2007, 02:21 AM   #19
James
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WOW! Amazing conditions in the pictures from JM and Ola. Any more information on that January storm session? Was waterstarting possible? I bet the entire kit would blow away if the rider let go.
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Old 25th October 2007, 03:05 AM   #20
Jean-Marc
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Floyd,
Ola,

Yes, I agree 10 Bft is a lot of wind, no question. To measure wind, I use an analog Deuta hand-held anemometer (precision 0.5 m/s or 1 knot), possibly at 2 m height above water level and away from any nearby interference (rocks, trees, fences, building, etc...). When measuring 35-45 knots, 35 is lull, 40 average and 45 is peak on the beach, but usually, it's a bit more windy at the middle of the lake (3-5 km wide). Beware of reading calibration as well, a cheap digital hand-held anemometer gave 48 knots peak and an online wheather station was topping off at 30 knots about 1 km downwind from the beach.
We have these kind of gale wind once a year in October or November, so I want to try that with say a 2.3 or 2.8 sail. When I tried it with a 3.0 sail last time, I got a leach to my back footstrap because as Ola pointed out, equipment is literally blown away from me when I fall, so it can become scary at time. However, if drifted away by the wind, one can always go back to shore on a lake (i.e., visit some private properties). November is fine because water is not too cold yet, i.e., 9-11°C, but air can be 4-6°C and the main trouble is to keep fingers warm enough on the boom despite the wind chill factor. January or February is way too cold, ice builds up on the sail, so better go skiing...

Cheers !

JM
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