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Old 6th June 2008, 01:19 AM   #11
Ellen Faller
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Hi Sandy,
Good to hear from you! It looks as though you've escaped New England for warmer parts.
Sounds as tho Roger has answered your questions about the sails, and he's good at that, but I have used the boom end flotation device.
I've got pro and con thoughts on the boom end flotation for waterstarts, and I've heard much the same from people I know who have them. They do help to float the boom end, and are most useful, in my opinion, for sails with camber inducers, and in places with a lot of current, and in fresh water where none of us float as well, including the gear.
On the other hand, they restrict your ability to adjust the outhaul, it's one more thing to put on and take off every time you rig, and they don't really help you to learn to fly the sail efficiently for a good waterstart. If you are in shallower waters with not much current, I'd save the money for a sail.
The device is a great idea, depending on what the circumstances are.
good sailing!
Ellen
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Old 6th June 2008, 09:22 PM   #12
wndsrf48
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Thanks Ellen and Roger for the information.

I will save my money, so that I can buy some new sails.

As to the question why I have a tendency to sail underpowered. One is thinking the wind is stronger than it is. The other is that when I was first learning how to get into the harness I took a very bad spill. It was bad enough that Andrea and another person ask me if I was alright. Also, during that time a did a couple of catapults. What can I do to get over this fear of going so fast that I am out of control.


Also, is there a limitation for what sails I can use on the F2 Phoenix 340.

thanks,
Sandy
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Old 7th June 2008, 04:46 AM   #13
Ellen Faller
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Hi Sandy,
I think many women go through this stage, and getting tossed isn't the most fun part of windsurfing to be sure! I recall being there myself, and there isn't a short/quick answer for getting past it. One day it happens. So, after that bit of wisdom, I'll try to put together a few thoughts. Please check back later as I have to take care of some stuff right now.
Ellen
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Old 8th June 2008, 11:30 AM   #14
Ellen Faller
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Okay, back to business... but without being able to actually *see* how you are sailing in the "overpowering" conditions that lead to the problem.
Some gear issues/things that can lead to that unpleasant "lifting" sensation... are boom too high for you (probably best at shoulder to chest height), harness lines set too far forward, harness lines a bit too long which means that you can't really commit to the lines and harness, perhaps not enough downhaul on the sail which can put too much power in the upper part of the sail where it is hard to control, especially for we women who do not have the upper body strength of the guys who thus have a better chance at control.
If your boom is at a good height, check your harness lines. Most people when learning, have them set forward, and long, in order to practice getting in and out of them. However, once you are really using them, the lines should be moved back a bit (try 5 hands or so from the boom attachment) and the lines shortened. This is because as you pick up speed, you'll be moving back on the board, sheeting in more, AND beginning to rake the mast back. If you don't begin to lean the mast back as you sheet in and move back, the center of effort of the sail will be too far forward and it will try to lift you off the board. If you *simply* move the mast back without having the speed, you'll just steer upwind, so there is some attention to technique involved.
Again, I haven't seen you sail, so I may easily be telling you things you already know and are doing, so please understand.
One important thing that you don't want to have happen, is to let your shoulders get pulled in front of your hips because then you have only arm strength to work with, and that is a losing battle. If standing up, your shoulders are directly over your hips, you have "neutral" leverage; if your shoulders are in front of your hips, you have no leverage and only arm strength; but if your shoulders are behind your hips and you are not bent at the waist, now you have lots of leverage and lots of leg strength (your largest muscle group is the thigh group). When your shoulders are behind your hips, you'll want to lean back against it as though it were the power boat pulling a waterskier, and the pressure should be through the front of your feet and not the heels. No pressure on the heels, as though there were a tack, point side up, in the heel of your booties. One can survive some major gusts by leaning out with the shoulders and straightening the legs.
If you then sail into a lull, you'll have to roll your shoulders in over your feet, and sheet out a bit to save yourself.
It is tough to type windsurfing instruction since it is such a dynamic sport, and there are so many variables, but I hope something here helps a bit. Please let us know how it goes.
cheers,
Ellen
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Old 10th June 2008, 12:08 PM   #15
Ellen Faller
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Hi again Sandy,
More thoughts, but on going fast this time. First thing, "fast" is relative. What seems fast now, probably won't seem as fast later on when you are more comfortable and confident at it. The transition from sailing *through* the water to planing on/over it is an exciting one, but people often feel out of control at the beginning. Comfort and confidence.
Remember, you don't have to (nor is it possible to) keep picking up more and more speed. If you are planing, you can do a few things to dump some of the speed if it is more than you care for. You can sheet out, just a little. You can head up wind a bit, which will usually slow you down.
Get in the straps and harness, go faster for a short distance, and then slow down. Practice sailing in the straps, then in the harness, then together. Learn to relax the arms and not hold on with a death grip, as tempting and instinctive as that seems to be. Once your arms are relaxed and you are countering the pull of the sail by leaning your shoulders farther out behind your hips and letting your legs do the work, and dropping your center of gravity, you'll be able to relax your brain, and will feel more comfortable.
good luck
Ellen
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Old 11th June 2008, 04:07 AM   #16
wndsrf48
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Ellen,

Thanks for the information. Some of it, I did know but some I did not. I do use my harness without a problem, but I have not gotten into the straps. The next chance that I get to go out I will think about what you said. And what Roger said about the size of the sail when I am out.

thanks,
Sandy
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