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Old 5th October 2012, 10:40 PM   #11
BelSkorpio
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Hi Farlo,

When we have 25 average on the North Sea, we often have peaks till 35 and a huge swell building up, depending if it's onshore or side shore.
Although the sail size of 5.5 could perhaps still be manageable, it is rather the board size of 65/103L that would kill me.
Even on our big lakes near the sea, without protection of a dam, I could encounter giant chop.

20/22 average up to 25 is something completely different of course, and for sure I would take my 5.5 sail in these conditions, BUT not a 65/103L board. In stead I would also use my 57/83L wave board in big chop or my IS87 + 5.7 or even 6.7 on fairly flat water.

I think that in high winds, i.e. 21+ average, the water state will play a much more important role in chosing the "right" kit.
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Last edited by BelSkorpio; 5th October 2012 at 10:53 PM.
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Old 5th October 2012, 10:45 PM   #12
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100 kilos/220 pounds

54 days sailed from APR to SEPT
42 of them on FreeFormula or Longboard 10-oh or 8-oh
11 on 160 liter board with 8-oh
1 on 124 liter LTD and 6.3

most memorable are on the 124 and some on the FreeFormula
best purchases this year = pass to park, FreeFormula and adjustable outhaul
no long board or free formula would have meant 12 days rather than 54 !!!!
now i average two(2) times per week
means happy me, butt unhappy wife - sometimes :-)
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Old 6th October 2012, 09:41 AM   #13
Farlo
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Unregistered, how lucky you are. My own statistics are closer to two times per month, ~twenty five per year on which fifteen are 7.8/7.3 days, five are 6.6/6.0 and five are 5.5 or less. This is probably why people on my spot tend to use boards on the large side, let's say 120/130L most of the time. The average Joe here is around 75/80 Kgs (myself 68).

Belskorpio, you are right. Water state makes a lot of difference. However last time I sailed at the sea was 20/22 up to 25 onshore with 1 meter swell. My smallest kit that day was 6.0 with 103L and 32cm fin. Most other people were on 4.7/85L. Nevertheless I managed to stay alive and it was for sure my best three hours session of the year.

Last edited by Farlo; 7th October 2012 at 11:33 AM.
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Old 7th October 2012, 01:42 PM   #14
Gyurmo
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i have to be agree... unfortunatelly. i think some people's dream about the optimal condition is not fits to the reality and general just some people afraid of the over power feeling. the sad is they lost lots of fun on a little bit bigger gear and they are able to spend much less time on the water in planning or in fun condition.

this is a big responsibility of the retailers.

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Old 12th October 2012, 08:16 PM   #15
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I think what often happens is we learn to windsurf as teenagers and get used to the idea of a small board with the volume that suited us back then. And then we typically put on weight as we age and are reluctant to increase the volume of our favourite kit.

Plus it depends where you usually sail, in that you may choose a board which is the right size for your home break, but when you take the same board on holiday you may find the rippy/white water conditions require more float than you have.

There is also a historical thing where people were told that 'sinkers' were the thing to have.
I'd say the advent of multfin boards is changing all this with shorter fins that don't overpower, people are now discovering that larger volume wave boards don't over-power so readily in strong winds and so have a broader wind and sail size range.

A final point is that some prefer to sail high rocker wave boards that don't plane so early i.e. they prefer to blob out and then catch a wave on the way in which is then ripped apart with the looseness of the board they have.
This is the opposite approach from sailing a fast tail or FSW board where you blast out at speed but then find the board rocker too stiff to really shred a wave face on the way back in.
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