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Old 5th March 2014, 11:34 AM   #11
joe_windsurfer
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believe a lot as to do with the rocker
here is an experiment that james douglass of florida has started
http://jimbodouglass.blogspot.ca/201...-finished.html
he has found that it planes WELL
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joe windsurfer @ 100 kg
2006 AHD type-F FF 160/79cm, 2012 JP SLW92, 2000 Fanatic BEE 124 LTD + Mistral Equipe I LCS
HSM Fire 6.3, Gaastra Flow 3x 7.0, TR-6 8.4, TR4 10.0

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Old 26th July 2014, 08:04 PM   #12
Jean-Marc
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Did not try the freeride 12'2" windSUP yet (it's on my to-do list), but I surmise max speed is related to the scoop-rocker line and the positionning of the mast base.
However, I did try the SUPer 10'0" with a 6.9 m2 sail in planing mode in ± 15 knots wind (see http://www.star-board-sup.com/forum/...ad.php?t=12089 for a summary) and found out that it was extremely difficult to start and sustain the planing with the mast base set on the front-most insert. When mast base was further moved to the back of the board, no problem to start and sustain the planning. Speed and acceleration were OK, but not dragster like à la iSonic of course... One can even do wide turn carved jibes.
So, my guess would be to move your mast base more to the back of the board to increase the planning and top speed. Something like 130 or 140 cm from tail's end ?

Cheers !

JM

Last edited by Jean-Marc; 26th July 2014 at 08:10 PM.
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Old 23rd August 2014, 09:42 PM   #13
Jean-Marc
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The long tail concept of the SUP Freeride explained by Tiesda You and how and where the transition from non-planing to planing will occur :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rAvG3qFVJu8

Chees !

JM
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Old 1st September 2014, 11:48 PM   #14
Jean-Marc
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Tried the WindSUP 12'2" Freeride today with a 7.0 m2 sail in 10-18 knots wind *. She has a very good glide and planing is extremely easy to do. However, acceleration is very progressive due to shape and scoop-rocker line. It is certainly not comparable with that of a Phantom Race 380 or with that of a short planing board. This is still a SUP board with easy planing ability when powered up with a sail. Did a Vmax of 14.6 kts today and I did not get the feeling that it was topping up. I'm sure I can do better than that with more wind or with a larger sail.

Cheers !

JM

(*) : see complete report in french here : http://www.star-board-windsurfing.co...ad.php?p=62354

Last edited by Jean-Marc; 2nd September 2014 at 09:19 AM.
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Old 6th October 2014, 10:13 AM   #15
Jean-Marc
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Dear waterloo,

Here are my thoughts about the 2014 WindSUP 12'2" x 30" Freeride Deluxe board after a couple of sessions :

1) SUP with a paddle.

The board is very stable thanks to her 75 cm (30") width and 237 L volume. On flat water, the glide and speed is extremely good, it reminds me of the All Star racing SUP board. The board felt more rigid while riding through small chop and there are less vibrations of the nose thanks to her thick rails than the thinner SUPer 12'6" board with her pure surfing rails for example. The double bevel shape and strong double concave of the nose is doing a great job at piercing waves, providing the rider stands fairly forward, well over the C motif printed on the deck. The board is easy to accelerate to catch bumps and glides very fast down the line of wind-generated waves. The nose can dive into the back of waves sometimes, but it does not brake nor destabilize the board when gliding downwind.
The board is very directional while gliding straight ahead and therefore is less snappy at turns when trying to make quick rail to rail transition. The rider must move forward on the deck and really press hard on her rail to initiate the turn on the wave. Once the board accelerates down the line, the rider can makes 2 steps backward and starts riding waves that range in height from 30-50 cm up to 1m - 1m50. In sum, this board rocks on flat water like a racing board but is also a joy when going downwind in small waves like a longboard. I did had great fun on my home lake.

2) WindSUP with a sail.

i) First test was on flat water with a Gator 7.0 m2 sail in 5-7 knots wind. The board felt very stable, beginners with a 5.x m2 sail or even kids with 2.x-3.x m2 sails should have no problems on her. The centerboard is very easy to manipulate with your foot and required much lees force than that of the Phantom Race windsurfing raceboard. The deck is very grippy and hold feet securely on the large EVA pad.

There are 3 mast base inserts on the deck. It's better to choose the most forward insert in light wind to improve the glide on flat water but to choose the most rearward insert to improve the planing in windiest or wavy conditions. A mast track rail (US box rail) would be simpler to use IMHO rather than 3 insert holes to adjust for the conditions while being out on water.

On one hand, pointing upwind with the centerboard down is very good when the mast base is screwed on the most forward insert position, providing the rider is pushing down the leeward rail with his/her toes. Pointing upwind with the centerboard up is difficult, however; the rider has to push the windward rail down with his/her heels to have some grip upwind.
On the other hand, pointing upwind with the centerboard up is almost impossible when the mast base is screwed on the most rearward insert position. The board simply drags sideways without any bite at low speed. No problems pointing upwind with the centerboard down, however.

The board is very easy to sail in light wind in displacement mode. Tacking or jibing are a breeze because of the high lateral stability, with centerboard either up or down. Cruising on flat water with an excellent glide and being able to go anywhere upwind or downwind is the obvious forte of this board.

ii) Second test was done with the same Gator 7.0 m2 sail but this time in windiest conditions, i.e., 10-18 knots wind and up to 30-40 cm swell. Mast base was screwed on the most rearward insert position.

The board has a very good glide in the 10-15 knots puffs. She accelerates very progressively and it's possible to make her planing at an average speed of 10-12 knots. Pointing upwind is OK with the centerboard up at speed, providing the rider pushes the windward rail down with his/her heels. However, pointing upwind is excellent with the centerboard down, providing the rider pushes the leeward rail down with his/her toes : pointing at 50-60° angle from the true wind, sometimes even less than that…!

Swell and wind were picking up at 40 cm and 12-18 knots, respectively. Vmax was achieved at 14.6 knots at 120-130° angle from true wind. Water sprays through and out of the centerboard pit when going at high speed because the lips are rather soft and make the centerboard go down or up a breeze even while sailing at high speed.

The board is a joy to ride backside in the swell (centerboard up). Bearing away on a wave curl, the rider has to move forward on the deck (front foot just behind the mast base) and press hard down on the leeward rail to start the turn. The board makes a large diameter turn, rips sideways on the rail that sits just below the carry handle. The nose points down the steep wave face, then the board quickly accelerates and surfs down the line very easily. At the bottom of the wave, the rider makes 2 steps backward on the deck, press down the windward rail hard to make the bottom turn, luffing up on the back of the wave and be ready for the next roller coaster. One can make 10 rollers or more when wave riding backside downwind. The final carving jibe can be done at full planing speed with the wave, a nice and easy treat to do. The cherry on the cake comes when one must go upwind back to the starting point : simply push down the centerboard and you can point upwind effortlessly.

Here are some GPS tracks of such backside wave riding on my home lake (wind coming from NE) : https://fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd.n...22251684_o.jpg

After 3 hours of pure fun, I decided to swap the WindSUP 12'2" Freeride board for a SUPer 12'6" with her more surfy scoop-rocker line and rails. First result : planing is extremely slow and sluggish as compared to that of the WindSUP 12'2" Freeride. Second result : it's difficult to make the SUPer 12'6" quickly start planing with the push of the wave, I'm kindda stuck on the wave curl and the board doesn't want to go down the line at planing speed. This is so frustrating that after 15 minutes I decided to give up and take back the WindSUP 12'2" Freeride board. The verdict is crystal-clear : speed and glide are back again at play, it's so much fun to play in the swell that I continued to sail for 2 more hours.

Another surprise came while riding the WindSUP 12'2" Freeride at high speed, but this time with the centerboard down : welcome to discovering the foiling mode. This is the effect of the long tail concept of such a special board. The board is planing like a classic board when the centerboard is up. By contrast when the centerboard is down, the board is planing but not like a classic board. At high speed (10-12 knots average), the soft centerboard bends like a "J" under the hull and starts to function like a foil. Half of the board hovers over the water at the level of the centerboard pit while the remaining half under the tail is planing. The rider needs to keep the board flat or slightly banked on her leeward rail to keep control of the foiling; if banked on her windward rail, the centerboard slips and this makes the board to land hard and flat over the water. This is a bit strange at first but once you're dialed in, it's pure fun to fly high above the water at speed with a smooth and silky ride without feeling too much chop or bumps. This is a unique feeling and much more forgiving and easy to do than trying to foil the Serenity with her 70 cm long and hard XXL Drake fin and ultra-thin kayak-shaped pintail.

iii) Third test was done again on flat water and light 3-8 knots wind, but this time against the legendary Serenity to compare the speed at gliding mode.

a) match racing between Serenity + Reflex 11 m2 sail against WindSUP 12'2" Freeride + Overdrive 7.5 m2 sail. No surprise, the Serenity remains the Queen in such ultra light wind conditions. Much better speed (twice that of wind speed) and much better pointing upwind angle. The WindSUP Freeride can be on par while planing only during the largest 8 knots gusts when I'm frankly overpowered with the Serenity + 11 m2, both reaching at Vmax 12-13 knots.

b) match racing between WindSUP 12'2" + 11 m2 sail against Serenity + 7.5 m2 sail. Big surprise here, it's very difficult for me to catch up and pass the Serenity from behind. The Serenity has the reputation of having an extremely good glide in ultra light wind conditions, and this even with a medium-sized sail (7.5 m2). However, the WindSUP Freeride has a very good glide as well in low wind range as I have found out above, so this makes things very interesting to compare. One can exploit this low wind range glide and speed of the WindSUP Freeride if one uses a very large 11 m2 sail. This large sail gives the board enough power to make her glide as fast as the Serenity + 7.5 m2 sail combo for back and forth sailing. The Serenity has only the upper hand in 3-4 knots lulls thanks to her awesome dragless hull shape and gliding potential whereas the WindSUP Freeride has the upper hand in the largest 7-8 knots gusts thanks to her foiling + planing hull shape. The speed of the Serenity does indeed top out at 12-13 knots Vmax because of her hull design limits whereas the speed of the WindSUP Freeride does not seem to top out because her hull can plane and accelerate further and further.

Pointing upwind the WindSUP Freeride + 11 m2 combo is good with the centerboard down, but not as good as that of the Serenity. Tacking and jibing the WindSUP FReeride + 11 m2 combo is a lot easier than that of the Serenity, and I mean that by a very large margin. Both boards share ± same volume (237 versus 255 L). However, the round-bottomed hull of the Serenity makes things quite tippy and difficult for a novice whereas the flat-bottomed hull of the WindSUP makes things much more stable and easier to handle a large and heavy sail. If one wants to keep the spirit of easy access, easy freeride and easy cruising usage of this WindSUP, I think that a camberless sail like the NCX 9.0 m2 (which is particularly light, easy to handle but grunty enough to power such a big longboard) should make such a board a nice combo in very light wind. More test to do next time…!

In sum, I would say that this WindSUP 12'2" Freeride board is a great board for SUPping both flat water and bumps downwind, even for surfing some small waves like a longboard. This board doubles up as a nice WindSUP board to sail in light wind and flat water with a large sail (7-11 m2), but also is really fun to sail in small swells or waves with medium-sized sail (7.0 - 7.5 m2) up to 15-18 knots of wind. However, this board is clearly not as fast as a Phantom Race windsurfing raceboard and is twice as slow as a dedicated slalom windsurfing short board like an iSonic. This WindSUP is not designed for maximum speed while windsurfing although she has an extremely good glide in low wind range.

Cheers !

JM

Last edited by Jean-Marc; 6th October 2014 at 10:15 AM.
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Old 9th October 2014, 10:30 AM   #16
Jean-Marc
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The german SUP magazine has tested 14 windSUP boards in august 2014 :

http://www.sup-mag.de/test_produkte/...en/a13909.html

Here is the test of the 12'2" Freeride : http://www.sup-mag.de/test_produkte/...un/a13819.html

Cheers !

JM
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Old 9th October 2014, 03:33 PM   #17
Jean-Marc
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SW 5-9 knots, very gusty and shifty. Drag racing with my iSonic 117W + 11 m2 sail against the WindSUP 12'2" Freeride + Overdrive 7.5 m2 sail. Below 7 knots wind, the WindSUP is faster with a better glide and semi-planing that result in a higher average speed. As soon as a 5-6 knots gust hits us, the windSUP is taking a 10-20 m lead very easily. Above 7 knots wind, I'm faster once I'm planing and I can catch up the WindSUP again and pass her eventually if the gust is long enough. The WindSUP is almost always found on the forefront position with such gusty, patchy and light wind conditions.

Cheers !

JM

Last edited by Jean-Marc; 9th October 2014 at 04:04 PM.
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