Old 20th September 2012, 03:06 PM   #11
Ken
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Dallas, Texas USA
Posts: 799
Default

As PG said...........

On wide boards, hitting the "lift off mode" can be achieved pretty easily. Sheeting out is disaster, so it's counter intuitive to keep the power on, but you must keep powered plus downward pressure on the mast base (hang your weight in the harness). Yes, move the base further forward in the track, it will help too as well as a smaller fin.
__________________
Toys:
Formula 160; iSonic 111; HiFly Move 105; Tiga 263; '85 Mistral Superlight.
Maui Sails TR 11.0; 9.2; 8.4; 7.6; 6.6; Maui Sails Switch 6.0; 5.2; Maui Sails Global 4.5; 4.0.
Ken is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20th September 2012, 10:53 PM   #12
Sailboarder
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 69
Default

Is that tailwalking?

I tought tailwalking was more when the board starts to oscilate from right to left and lift you over the water and the fin. The board nose doesn't raise much more than the back. You will get the nose up if you open the sail tough. This is how I get out from this.

This is caused by too much lenght of fin and maybe by a flexible fin too. (7.5 sail, gust of 30kts on flat water, 46 cm fin on 135l freeride board). Switching to a 40 fixes it.
Sailboarder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21st September 2012, 02:59 PM   #13
Ken
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Dallas, Texas USA
Posts: 799
Default

Sailboarder,

Yes, it is tail walking. The early stages of tail walking is much as you describe, but the nose is lifting and with enough speed and wind (+ apparent wind), the board will take off. Almost all boards will do this in the right circumstances even with a small fin (wind speed, smooth water, wide board, sailor weight, size of sail, point of sail (beam reach or higher).

With enough skill to hold down a 7.5 on a beam reach on a 135 L board in 30 knots on flat water with a 40cm fin, a 90 kg sailor will probably stay on the water, but a 70 kg sailor will be in the air.
__________________
Toys:
Formula 160; iSonic 111; HiFly Move 105; Tiga 263; '85 Mistral Superlight.
Maui Sails TR 11.0; 9.2; 8.4; 7.6; 6.6; Maui Sails Switch 6.0; 5.2; Maui Sails Global 4.5; 4.0.
Ken is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd September 2012, 03:09 PM   #14
Krister
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 65
Default

Another thing to keep in mind is that sheeting angle is also determined by the position of the mast.
The clew might not move but if you pull the mast towards you, you are also effectively sheeting out. Even worse you have now directed the lift of the sail upwards and you take off, just like the guy in the youtube clip above.

Never let go of your equipment, that will just make things worse. Instead pull on you backhand and you either make a little jump and sail on, or you'll make a partial forward loop and land on your back without any issues.
Krister is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Us147 BelSkorpio Free Forum 3 21st May 2012 09:32 PM
US147 - Where are the movies ?? BelSkorpio Ask Our Team 10 25th December 2010 08:00 PM


All times are GMT +7. The time now is 12:22 PM.