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Old 18th July 2008, 05:25 AM   #11
Roger
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Hi Ted,
It was great to meet your and figure this out.
Don't feel bad, not getting the mast far enough upwind is a very common problem.
Glad to be of help!
Roger
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Old 18th July 2008, 05:15 PM   #12
marek
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Same here, Roger.
I had this problem on the very beginning, solved it exactly this way and then forgot about it completely until I got on the way smaller and narrower board.

I remember originally I solved it by reading instruction in the book to move the mast upwind until I could see the nose through the sail and _then_ sheet in.

BTW: exactly after 1.5 year after I got on the windsurfing board for the 1st time I had a full-control session last weekend on my F-type and 10.0 Gaastra GTX in both straps, planing from underpowered to slightly overpowered, lifting the windward rail and bearing off in the lulls (I was able to stay on plane in really low wind) and getting really good upwind angles in the gusts (going 1 mile in one direction). Got used to the speed enough that I tried planing jibes a couple of times (not successful, but not too bad either). Completed a couple of helicopters on this jumbo sail ;-).
Thanks to Roger and other people on this forum.

-marek
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Old 18th July 2008, 07:55 PM   #13
Roger
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Hi Marek,
Thanks for your kind words!
It's good to hear some positive feedback that the discussions here on this forum are making a difference for advancing sailors.
I always get a little "rush" when I hear that one of you have made a breakthrough tothe next level.
When I was learning, there were no forums, and "breakhroughs" didn't occur as quickly and there was no one to share it with.
It's awesome that you are fully up to speed in 1.5 years.
Regards,
Roger
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Old 24th August 2008, 11:44 AM   #14
mitchiedog
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Its interesting that most of the modern tuition DVDs never mention to 'bring the mast up wind". They tend to focus on "sheeting in" and "move back slowly" to help learners progress. My theory is that advanced windsurfers completely forget about the forces turning the board upwind - that is, they do it so instinctvely, to bear the board away before they try and get planing, that they dont know even know they do it. For learners, this is the most noticeable force of all after getting you balance. I've watched many videos and DVDs and they simply overlook it. They say "rig forward and bear the board away" but this is only half the story. It really clicked for me when I was told to bring the mast upwind.
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Old 16th September 2008, 04:27 PM   #15
marek
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marek View Post

BTW: exactly after 1.5 year after I got on the windsurfing board for the 1st time I had a full-control session last weekend on my F-type and 10.0 Gaastra GTX in both straps, planing from underpowered to slightly overpowered, lifting the windward rail and bearing off in the lulls (I was able to stay on plane in really low wind) and getting really good upwind angles in the gusts (going 1 mile in one direction). Got used to the speed enough that I tried planing jibes a couple of times (not successful, but not too bad either). Completed a couple of helicopters on this jumbo sail ;-).
Thanks to Roger and other people on this forum.

-marek

Just wanted to share a couple of pictures from the last weekend.
You can see me on my F-type and 9.8 Gaastra GTX. Sweet combo. :-)

http://picasaweb.google.pl/mzawadzk/...ica2008091214#

-marek
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Old 16th September 2008, 08:31 PM   #16
Roger
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Hi Marek,
You are doing extremely well.
Your stance looks excellent!
Glad we could be a part of your joy!
R
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Old 17th September 2008, 01:56 PM   #17
marek
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Default Moving the straps on Carve?

Hey, thanks for the kind words .
I still have LOTS of stuff to learn, but isn't it great?

Next year I hope to learn jibing and to get as comfortable on my 111 Carve as I am currently on my F-type. I was thinking about moving the back strap on my Carve to the very inboard position (both straps are now in their middle positions) to learn quicker.
I find that riding Carve's fin is way different from F-type and perhaps I don't need that much leverage but I can change my setup to get into the back strap more easily.
What do you think?

-marek
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Old 17th September 2008, 08:18 PM   #18
Roger
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Hi Marek,
Since you can obviously get into all 4 outboard straps on the F-Type, I'd suggest putting the straps on your Carve 111 in the most outboard and back positions.
Yes, there will be a short "learning curve" until your muscle memory figures out that the straps aren't in the ususal F Type positions, but that shouldn't take but a few runs.
Probably the biggest "adjustment" you face is learning to stay off the fin until you have the requisite speed for the fin to really "hook up" and be able to withstand more side pressure.
If you can find one, get an oversized slalom/race type vertical pointer fin for the Carve 111. I'd think something in the 38-46 range would work as a "transition fin" and also help to get you planing alot sooner.
What fin are you currently using in your C-111?
Hope this helps,
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Old 18th September 2008, 02:02 PM   #19
marek
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Roger, the board came with a larger than standard fin, Drake Freeride 380.
I have my straps set in middle position:


I was able to get into both straps a couple of times, but it requires quite a lot of wind. I was thinking by moving back strap more inboard I could get into both straps quicker. Generally I don't feel comfortable until in both footstraps - then I can correct my stance and start working on the upwind progress. It seems I either do something wrong or I really need a decent speed to start getting into back footstrap.

When in both straps it was great, however I caught a spinout a few times (admittedly though I was trying to get upwind heavily as I lost ground before to get on plane - which follows the same pattern as with F-type at the beginning).

Generally my biggest problems with C-111 are:
- to quickly get on plane, into straps and make upwind progress
- to uphaul (the board is sinking, I am ~85kg) - I'm thinking maybe I should have gotten 122 instead of 111
- to tack (I don't even think about jibing)

-marek
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Old 18th September 2008, 07:40 PM   #20
Roger
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Hi Marek,
OK, let's back up a bit here.
What is the wind speed when you are trying to sail you Carve 111?
What sail size are you using?
What is "downwind" that makes you so focused on sailing upwind as soon
as possible?
Why are you not jibing the Carve 111? (Assuming that you are jibing the F-Type).

An 85 Kg. sailor will need a 7.5 m2 rig and a minimum of about 13-14 knots of wind to get the Carve 111 planing.
If you can get planing, there should be no real issues with staying upwind as soon as you have good speed. Sounds like you are "rushing things" kinda like you did on the F-Type at first...... right?
Don't rush to get into the footstraps.
Unless there are many hungry great white sharks, or a mine field "downwind" there's nothing I see that would compel you to have to stay upwind so much.
Get the board going, get your speed up, THEN work to gain back any upwind position you lost while getting going.
I think you sail on a small lake, right?
I agree that it's not so cool to come back downwind of where you started, but until you get the Carve 111 all figured out, sail back as close as you can to where you started then do a couple of tacks and tip you board upwind rail down and slog back upwind.
In slog mode, for short periods of time, you can really tip the board and make lot's of upwind progress. Is it fun?.....no! but it eliminates coming back in downwind of your launch.
Also, on your last couple of runs, focus on upwind and using the whole lake as longer runs will give you better upwind progress.
You've made phenomenal progress on the F-Type, so you will most likely make the same sort of progress on the Carve 111 if you have wind conditions and rig size to use a board that small.
Remember, you are coming off one of the earliest planing freeride boards ever produced, so my guess is that you are wanting use the Carve in conditions that aren't quite optimal for a board that small.
A larger board (the Carve 122) might help, as it's a little wider and more floaty, so it will get going in a knot or 2 less wind, but at the top end of things it will get "too big" a couple of knots sooner as well.
Stick with it, when you have enough wind, and I think you'll learn to love the Carve 111.
One day you will be sailing even smaller boards and wonder why you had these issues, but they are all part of the learning curve.
What size is your "oversize" fin. Is it a vertical pointer or a curvy freeride fin?
Hope this helps,

Last edited by Roger; 18th September 2008 at 07:43 PM.
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