Go Back   Starboard Forums > Free Forum

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 19th July 2008, 10:35 PM   #11
Roger
Dream Team - School Guru
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 2,110
Default

Hi Unregistered,
There are boards that do well in 12-18 knots (IS 122, Futura 122, and several others boards in the 115-130 liter range.
There are several boards that do well in 8-12 knots.
So, the answer to your question is most likely 2 boards.
One that does well in 8-14 knots and one that does well in 14-20 knots.
All of this depends also on sailor weight, surface conditions (voodoo chop
etc.)
I am certainly not saying that you cannot sail in 10-20 knots with one board, but
as suggested by the other posters, you are either going to be slogging (not planing)
in the under 13 knots (even with big sails) if your board is on the small side, or you are going to be limiting your performance in 17-20 knots if you have a board that's too large/wide.
There are exceptions (Formula boards being the most notable) but you need to be able to handle a seemingly huge sail (9.0 m2- 11 or 12 m2) to get the full performance from these specialty racing type boards.
If you want to expand this to cover 8 knots to say 30 knots, then probably 3 boards are needed to be comfortably planing throughout this range of windspeeds.
You would also need sails from about 4.0 m2 to 10.0 m2 so probably a minimum of 4 sails to cover 8-30 knots.
It's often better to have a bit of "overlap" in your board/sail/fin quivers as having great conditions, but no gear that really suits those conditions isn't going to be much fun.
The 3 boards/4 rigs for 8-30 knots is the minimum you will need to be reasonably comfortable in all conditions you are likely to find in that wind range.
Of course many of us sail in places that have relatively stable windspeeds and surface conditions, so we can get by with one board that suits those conditions and a couple of sails.
Hope this helps,
Roger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20th July 2008, 12:41 AM   #12
Farlo
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 528
Default

Hello dkeith,
With your 68 Kgs you don't need much more than a FU 122 or 133 to have fun in the 10-20 Knts range. I'm about the same weight and I've been using a ST-126 for years as my light wind board in similar conditions: 80% lake - 20% sea, wind from 12 to 18 knts most of the tilme, with a 7,3 mē sail and 2 fins. I was not sailing below 12 Knts, but the ST would have taken a larger sail, and moreover the FU's which are much wider. Of course it won't be the most exciting in 8-12 Knts but these conditions are rarely exciting on a lake anyway.
Farlo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21st July 2008, 12:37 AM   #13
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Related Q for Roger or others

I have a related question if you don't mind me adding on to this thread. Roger, I see you have a Futura 133 and would appreciate your (or others) opinions as I am trying to decide between a Futura 133 or Futura 144.

I am an advanced sailor, 77kg, sail on freshwater lakes and am looking for a board to use with my 8.3 and 7.0 sails.

Thanks,

RC
  Reply With Quote
Old 21st July 2008, 02:00 AM   #14
Roger
Dream Team - School Guru
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 2,110
Default

Hi RC,
I'd go for the Futura 133.
With your sail sizes (8.3/7.0) and at 77 Kg. (170 Lbs.) I don't think you would find significantly more early planing on the Futura 144.
If you had a 9.0-10.0 m2 rig, then I think the additional width (77.5 vs 76.0 or 1.5 cm) would get you planing earlier, but with the 8.3 as your "big rig" the Futura 133 should get you going within about half a knot of the 144.
Sailing on fresh water is a consideration, for sure, but the additional volume would not help very much without the bigger rig to power it.
You will find that the additional top end range of the 133 is more significant than a minor gain on the bottom end/early planing.
Hope this helps,
Roger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21st July 2008, 02:17 AM   #15
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Roger,

Thanks a lot for your insightful and quick reply!

Best regards,

RC
  Reply With Quote
Old 21st July 2008, 04:41 PM   #16
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default Unregistered

Thanks Roger.

A quick check of retail prices means that I'm up for about $13,300, not including board bags, wetsuit, harness, harness lines, roofracks. Ouch. That takes me out of the 'performance' windsurfing game.
  Reply With Quote
Old 21st July 2008, 07:19 PM   #17
pierrec45
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Sydney
Posts: 81
Default 10-20 knots

> $13k+

Well, there you go. Of course the more gear, the better. Two would be nice for that range, but then twice the costs, twice the stuff to carry, plus wasting time de-rigging and re-rigging as winds change. (The more gear, the more of that.)

Seriously, take up freestyle and aim for about 16-17 knots with new, single gear. Esp. that you already own light- and high-wind gear. This way, when it's only 10-12 knots, for the same new gear, you're underpowered somewhat but you get to practice moves that you will use in the 15-20 knot range. Fun and sport at all times.

> how many boards and sails does the average sailor 'need'
> to sail in all conditions?

You are an expert, so don't go by this criteria. Most guys at the local spot here (a 90% lake-river like you) have multiple gear, but I find that gear gets used mostly to make sailing easier at various conditions (underpowered, easier to gybe, etc.).

Have fun mate,
P.

Last edited by pierrec45; 21st July 2008 at 07:23 PM.
pierrec45 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21st July 2008, 09:09 PM   #18
Roger
Dream Team - School Guru
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 2,110
Default

Hi Unregistered,
I've said all the way through this that you don't "have to have" 3 boards and 4 rigs!
If you select your boards carefully, and if you sail in one area most of the time, you can easily get by with one or 2 boards and 2 or 3 rigs.
Around 12 knots is the real decision point.
If you want to sail in 12-18 knots, one board and maybe 2 sails will do nicely.
If you want to plane in < 12 knots, that takes specialized and expensive larger gear.
You can choose to not sail in < 12 knots and then you don't need the larger gear.
Same at about 20 knots.
A 100-120 liter board (depends a bit on the sailor's weight) and a 7.5/6.0 m2 sail quiver
and you can have a good time. Might be a little over powered and the board may be a little big at 20 knots, but you can do it.
The posters here have been asking hypothetical questions like "how much gear does it take to cover 10-30 knots".
I've been providing real world answers.
You could go out with a board and sail that is designed for 10 knots of wind.
In 20 knots you might be able to sail sheeted out, and bounding over the chop (I've experienced this many times when the wind speed jumped up) but it would not be fun.
I took a ride in the St. Francis Yacht club RIB safety boat a few years back at Crissy Field.
I was on an appropriately sized rig, but my friend was on gear that was too big when the wind suddenly increased from around 15 knots to well over 20 knots.
I took the big gear and gave my smaller gear to the friend so they could sail back in comfortably.
I spent a good 15-20 min. trying to waterstart and sail back in but the gear and the conditions were just too much.
So, the safety boat came by, I rolled up the gear and took the ride.
So, the bottom line here is that at some point, your big gear becomes too big for you sail it, and at some point your small gear becomes too small for you to effectively sail it.
In either case you need gear more appropriate for the conditions to have any fun.
Hope this helps,
Roger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd July 2008, 01:40 AM   #19
steveC
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 639
Default

No doubt, new windsurfing gear can be an expensive investment. What I've found is that time and patience can be your friend. Each year, I try to target important investments that I need to consider. Over time, you can build an awesome quiver of stuff that doesn't break the bank all at once. Another thing that helps greatly is to keep the stuff you do buy for a long time, and avoid the strong temptation to keep up with the latest fashion.

Lastly, although it doesn't fit with everyone's way of doing things, there's always the credit card or line of credit method of buying things. While one does pay an interest penalty to buy on credit, it does allow one to spread out the payments over time. I bought my first complete windsurfing kit, to include racks, by refinancing my car. Overall, despite the added cost, I never regreted that decision, not for one second.
steveC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22nd July 2008, 04:13 AM   #20
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Good points Steve. Thanks
  Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +7. The time now is 06:10 AM.