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Old 7th September 2008, 08:57 PM   #11
crazychemical
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i'm not saying all gear will break from overusage. Just that in second hand cases you can't be sure how used they really are because you can't possibly see the internal structure. Furthermore, the theory says it only increases the risk. The hight of this risk is dependant on the type of crashes, the way one treats his/her equipment etc. This is true for all gear, from windsurfing to tennis.
i do'nt mind buying second hand gear. if i can get myself a good deal i'll go for it. But i always get gear i can properly inspect. you can check masts for useage, you can check boards for cracks, splinters and repairs, but you can't check booms because of the EVA around it and even if you could the ALU booms tend to show the usual scratches from day one and C-booms are even harder to inspect.
I try to buy my gear new if i can, but i rarely have the funds to and seeing as i'm not a prorider who gets new gear every so often i have to really outway what 'ill buy new and what i'll buy used. Thats why i started this thread in the first place.
Ok, no such thing as a good budget boom but amidst the cr*p there should be a few decent buggers. The guys from my windsurffrat told me not to buy the prolimit freemove anymore because with my increasing slalom and speed addiction i'll just end up breaking it after less then 2 years or so. The question wether i'll break another boom one day is irrelevant, i know i probably will, as i will break masts, tare sails and break and damage boards. The biggest question i have is: untill i finish my education and can finally start making money so i can buy myself propper carbon and whatnot gear, what is most resistant.
So far my preferance has gone to Amex or Nautix as a replacement. But i can't find good dealers and i seem to have struck a good deal on a new prolimit freemove again (like 70€). If i wreck it within 3 years it still barely cost me anything. But if someone here says: hey, i bought this boom, i'm a heavyweight too, and it didn't cost me too much and it still lived to see 4 years without the least of problems i'll look into it.
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Old 8th September 2008, 12:43 AM   #12
HotIce
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Wink Rethink

You have been given excellent advice on this thread.

A second carbon boom is definitely your best option.

I decided to try a new modern alloy boom last year. Plenty of hype around it. You know , modern shape, continuous head, tapered arms, top pro sailor saying it was strong, etc, etc.... Just one little problem it broke after about only 15 sessions.

Ola_H is spot on regarding carbon. If it is going to fail it will normally be within the first few sessions.

Check out the pros web sites. They are always selling top gear, some of it with little use.


Happy hunting.
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Old 8th September 2008, 01:05 PM   #13
geo
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Look for an used carbon boom. No way to save money with aluminum booms if you're 95 kg.
If I was in your shoes, I'd look for a boom with its original grip: this way it wil show all possible damages from sharp objects, which is the only thing that could possibly harm a carbon boom durability. If there are no dings/scratches on the carbon tubes (that obviously have to cut through the grip to happen), then in my view you can go safe. Old grip will also lower price, leaving up to you the decision to regrip or not.
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Old 8th September 2008, 04:45 PM   #14
Floyd
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Smile Carbon every time !

I`m with Ola on this one. I`ve heavy (100k+) and over years have broken (and bent beyond use) loads of aluminium booms.Broke one carbon (tube!) and was still able to sail in on other tack.(Boom still felt usable on non-broken side)
Alloy (Aluminium) undergoes metal fatigue even when used within its design limits.Carbon fibre does not.(Fatigue) Dings on the beach destroy carbon.(point loading braking fibres)You can look for dings.(Even if it means removing grip)You will never find the fatigue in an alloy.(You see the corrosion though)To my mind you are at least 4 times as likely to break an alloy boom.
I remember days of aluminium masts. (Serfiac pro etc). I would simply not use them at sea ! (They were fantstic for performance /weight but I could break one sheeting in !)
Aluminium development has not moved on in last 10 years; on the other hand Carbon/kevlar/dyneema usage has made fantastic leaps.(Pardon the pun!)

My advice to anyone would be dump the alloy boom;if you are heavy its almost essential !!

Personally would rather take my odds with a 3 season old second hand Carbon. (Amex/HPL even MK or dare I say it NP (x9) than any brand new alloy.(Aluminium)
MK sell reconditioned (regripped) carbon.(Dont like clamp though)They must have faith in them !
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Old 8th September 2008, 04:52 PM   #15
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Will i be super happy with the Chinook carbon big wave, or should i await the MS booms to get back into stock (2009 version perhaps)?

Sorry for slightly hijacking the thread,
Northy
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Old 8th September 2008, 04:53 PM   #16
NORTHY
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Will i be super happy with the Chinook carbon big wave, or should i await the MS booms to get back into stock (2009 version perhaps)?

Sorry for slightly hijacking the thread,
Northy

Whoops - forgot to login hence the double post...
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Old 8th September 2008, 05:17 PM   #17
uk3
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Default alloy vs carbon

it seems pretty unanimous that carbon booms are the way forward but does rider weight make a difference? it would be silly for me at 60kg to give advice to a 95kg but i snapped 2 aluminium Hawian proline booms in quick succession and i think its just because they weren’t very good not just because they were alloy. I then bought a north silver series alloy boom and never looked back, its still great after a season and a half of hard wipe outs in big waves, if the build quality is good would body weight be more of an important factor as to whether you buy carbon or alloy?
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Old 8th September 2008, 09:12 PM   #18
Floyd
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Talking

Bigger sailor will generally (always?) have bigger sail on.Hence longer boom hence more chance of breaking.Bigger sail collects more water inshorebreak hence better chance of breaking.
105 k falling onto boom against 60k falling on boom? bit obvious really ?
Generally bigger sailor (especially in my case) more likely to wipeout (clumsy???) in first place.
Bigger sailors (always) sail faster(????) faster wipeout ? better chance of breakage !
(Last comment is said in jest) But ask Dave White what he uses ?
Its not a competition really. We gave up on aluminium masts years ago but persist with booms ??? Not sure why ???
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Old 10th September 2008, 04:01 PM   #19
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Unhappy Perception is reality

Quote:
Originally Posted by Floyd View Post
. We gave up on aluminium masts years ago but persist with booms ??? Not sure why ???
IMHO I feel it is:-

Because some people think alloy is cheaper, but in the long run its not.

Because some people have been misled into believing that using carbon is somehow being elitist.

Because some people miss the most important point that carbon is far stronger than alloy.
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Old 10th September 2008, 11:53 PM   #20
steveC
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While I stopped using aluminum boom in 1992 after I broke 6 of them in one year (and I'm surprisingly on the lightweight side of the spectrum), there are many other folks that seem to get pretty good use out of them. I don't know what it is, but I think one's sailing style and not necessarily one's weight that has a lot to do with whether aluminum will work overall. Aluminum booms are significantly cheaper overall, so that lures many, but I guess whether you stick with the bargain game is ultimately determined by the frustration factor and how many time you get let down. I wouldn't use aluminum booms even if they were free. From my perspective, carbon booms are the only way to go, despite their premium price.
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