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Old 13th March 2009, 10:18 PM   #11
Screamer
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Ken

Sometimes you need to bear off more and build up a lot of speed (this in lighter and/or holey wind), but sometimes I actually pinch upwind to stuff my back foot in the strap (when overpowered). The problem might be that you take a lot of your weight off the harness (the moment you go for the back strap) and lose mastfoot pressure. In any case there's not much room to be hesitant when going for the back strap on wide, fast boards. Btw I use an iS122.

Maybe not strictly related, but look at this:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WvluU...om=PL&index=24
An excellent fluid gybe, but it's unusual for a wide slalom - he went strap to strap (he flipped in switch stance like he's on a waveboard), and furthermore, he goes back foot FIRST in the strap.
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Old 14th March 2009, 12:22 AM   #12
Ken
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Screamer,

Thanks for the response. I should have this foot strap move nailed by now given the 25 years I have been sailing. I have no problem with normal free ride or wave boards with the rear strap(s) in the inboard position.

With the fast acceleration on the formula and iS 111, I am not comfortable bearing off and moving my rear foot at the same time. I guess I just have to commit and maybe get tossed a few times. Between the variety of foot strap set ups on my my four boards, I just haven't nailed an automatic response for each one because I may be on a different board each time I go out.

Your harness comment makes me think that I may be able to increase my balance and free up my rear foot for an easier transition.

Clearly, in the overpowering situations I will be heading up to gain control and will get into the straps from that point, I just tend to do this when it's not necessary.

Thanks again,
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Old 15th March 2009, 02:18 AM   #13
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Hi Ken

Had the same problems when sailing my F 160. In flat water conditions it worked, but when sailing Formula in onshore or cross on conditions it was a nightmare, especially on the tack where you have to cross the waves. Either I pointed upwind with very little pressure in the sail, then the beast headed up immediately when I tried to get in the back strap, or I had to turn it on a reach course, it accelerated like mad and still crossing (jumping) the waves. Then I watched a good friend sailing my board in these conditions. It looked so easy he was in both straps in a second after every tack or jibe. No heading up. Watching him was the solution for me. He pointed upwind, not planning, but jumped into both straps without heading further upwind. Yes it is about having your weight supported by the rig during stepping back and into the straps. But you need some sail power to support all your weight. The scary solution is, turn downwind normally sheeted moderately out the first meters. Result Fast acceleration and the sail are pulling you forward when you try to reach the back strap. Ok it works, but risky in very powered up situations or very ruff water state. In these situations it looks like the sail is supporting your body weight but it does not in the right way.
You are still standing too much “over “the board. You only “balance” the sail pull with your body. Therefore you only have a split second to move into the back strap. On wave or most smaller freeride boards it is not so big a problem, as your downforce on the board is closer to the centreline of the board, and not as fare out on the windward rail as on formula/slalom boards.
So what is the most balanced sailing position ? It is when you have sheeted in, your body leaning out over the board, so you can “hang” your weight in the sail. But how do you get the sail power to do this immediately after a tack, low speed still pointing upwind ? It is by pushing the rig forward (but sheeted in).
When moving back to the straps on formula or slalom boards, you pull the rig back with your body moving back. Result is depowering your rig, lost mast foot pressure and your weight to much over the board(windward rail).
So after a tack or jibe grip the boom as far back as possible (as in normal hooked in sailing position) sheet in immediately and get the sail power and mast foot pressure from pushing the mast/rig forward, so your body can hang out away from the board, so now you have some seconds to move in both foot straps in a balanced body position. (planning sailing position) Then straighten out your front leg, weight on toes and the board turns downwind. You are in both straps accelerating and you pull the rig back with increasing sail power.
It worked for me; maybe it is BS for you. And sorry for the long explanation, but English is mot my native language.

Have fun
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Old 15th March 2009, 04:16 PM   #14
Floyd
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Its a fantastic explanation and quite amazing if English isnt natural to you.


Take care.
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Old 17th March 2009, 01:58 AM   #15
Ken
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LK,

Ditto what Floyd said.

I hope to get out this week a couple of times, so I will try your suggestions. Many thanks for the help.
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Old 17th March 2009, 04:30 AM   #16
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Hi
You are welcome, would be nice if it could be some help for you !

Cheers
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Old 1st August 2009, 01:47 PM   #17
davide
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken View Post
Davide,

Thanks for the advice. I guess I don't bare off enough, but will work on smoothing things out. I have a similar problem with my formula board, and I guess I have developed a bad habit of heading up too much after a jibe.
Just as a follow up: it turned out that I had a bit of a problem getting in the straps when sailing in very powered/gusty conditions. What seemed to help was ... changing straps. I dumped the rear drake-straps, got a pair of DaKine and ... never had much of a problem since. I think the stock straps are quite hard to adjust and very stiff, while the DaKine are softer and have a nicer entry (and are much easier to adjust). Whatever the reason my entry problems seem to be gone.
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Old 1st August 2009, 09:36 PM   #18
Ken
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Davide,

Thanks for the update. I may give the strap change out a try. All I need is wind - summer in north Texas doesn't offer winds over 10 knots very often, and then my formula board is usually the call.

I also always booties too, which probably contributes to the problem.
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Old 3rd August 2009, 06:48 PM   #19
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Further to LK's advice. Moving forward and keeping your weight on the boom is much easier with slightly longer harness lines.
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