Go Back   Starboard Forums > Free Forum

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 19th August 2009, 07:16 AM   #11
Philip
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 159
Smile

The way I see things is that *Board with its focus on wider and thinner boards is actually offering kit that has a broader sail carrying capacity than the traditional shape boards. This is what they say and from my experience is what we get. For many of us it is entirely feasible to do one board with multi-sails and fins for the most sailed conditions. I say good on them.
Philip is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19th August 2009, 09:50 AM   #12
Deja Vu
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 70
Default

Starboard isn't the only manufacturer full of BS! Take a look at the Slalom V blurb for JP boards - "Antoine tried the Slalom V boards and knew he had to do something so he signed with us". That implies that the Slalom V boards are so much better than the Isonics that AA had no alternative but to switch - yeah right! It was all about "Show me the money!" I can understand why Starboard is a little aggressive with its marketing after that crap. I'm sure Starboard paid AA significant funds so it might as well get as much traction from his name as it can.
Deja Vu is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20th August 2009, 12:36 AM   #13
Farlo
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 528
Default

Yes but... Screamer is right. Sounds like Starboard is short of arguments, while iSonic's have been consistently reported as far more accessible than JP's for the average sailor (which is less exciting of course).

Hi Floyd, I don't see your point. Manufacturers are always claiming the (ever) wider wind range of their boards/sails. Today you can still get a lot of fun from a small quiver. But some of us are willing to try&buy new gear while keeping favourite old stuff. So we end up with full garages although using the same one board and two sails most of the time.

Last edited by Farlo; 20th August 2009 at 12:54 AM.
Farlo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20th August 2009, 01:30 AM   #14
Floyd
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 459
Cool

Hi Farlo
Must be making my point badly because I totally agree with your last post.
My point is manufacturers work very hard to get us to buy lots of kit; much of which overlaps. (boards and rigs) and some of which is almost redundant.
Look at situation with rigs/masts.I`m pretty sure some mathematician (salesman/marketing person ??/) sat down and calculated just how to get us to buy largest number of masts possible. I take 5 masts to cover 7 sails !!!; and my biggest is still a compromise !!!

Point with listing our kit is its just another way of "normalising" having shed loads of kit !!!
Look at Remi`s posts; he lists 22 boards !!!! How does that work !!!!
I struggle choosing between 100 and 125 litres most days ..!!!(And I always think I made wrong choice!!!)

Windy this work so dont care anymore. Keep up the BS Starboard; we all love it really !!!
Floyd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 20th August 2009, 06:13 PM   #15
yankiwi
New Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 15
Default

I am new to windsurfing (started about 9months ago). I am now totally addicted. But I gotta say at first I wondered if it was worth the trouble. For a newbie, the different range of kit and combinations of sails/boards/fins that do or don't work together and do or don't work in particular wind strengths, wave sizes, and general alignment of the moon with other planets in the solar system is nuts.
And retailers are often no help, I can't tell you how many times I got advice, that knowing what I know now, was total BS and trying to sell me something that was not suited to my level. Problem for retailers is that they are hungery and not thinking long term.
I believe one of the reasons windsurfing is not as popular as it used to be is that the industry has made it way too complicated. Combine that with the fact that it is not easy to learn the sport anyway (many of you who have sailed for years might have forgotten this :-) ) and it is tough to get into windsurfing.
Anyone want to buy some of the 'mistakes' I was bought in the last 9 months? I have some great deals going :-).
I suspect the industry has largely given up on bringing in new people and is determined to milk already addicted windsurfers for everything they can get. That is the only logic I can apply to the way gear is developed and marketed.
yankiwi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21st August 2009, 03:49 AM   #16
Ken
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Dallas, Texas USA
Posts: 799
Default

yankiwi,

You are correct, windsurfing was uncomplicated in the early years (1984 for me). As for the dedicated inland sailors in those days, we had a long board and a glass short board and maybe 3 or 4 sails. Beginners weren't much different from the dedicated sailors so it was simple for them to get started and not be overwhelmed by the equipment. We all sailed one of a half dozen or so long board that were on the market with their 6.3 m regatta sail.

Would I go back to those years? No way. Yes it is now complicated with hundreds of choices, but it IS SO MUCH BETTER.

In the beginning, there was only ONE car, but now look at the choices. Progress and marketing, that's the way it goes.

The industry hasn't given up on new people. To the contrary, learning is so much easier today with all the stable, wide beginner boards. On the other hand, windsufing just doesn't appeal to the masses, plus there are so many other things competing for our recreational free time.

To find the right stuff for you, you just have to talk to people, on the beach, at the shop or on line like you are doing now.

Last edited by Ken; 26th August 2009 at 08:55 PM.
Ken is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21st August 2009, 07:06 PM   #17
Farlo
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 528
Default

Yes it takes trials and errors to find what works best for you, but it is worth the pain, time and money. Guess many of us spend a lot in the first years and then stabilize quiver and only replace most used board/sails from time to time.

Hello Floyd, redundancy is not only due to manufacturers. They have boards every ten liters and sails every 0.5 sqm in order to offer the best combinations for your weight & wind conditions. Now there is always one combination that works best in a given wind strength. So if you want to cover from 3 to 7 Bft you may need five boards. That's why some end up with three freeride/slalom plus two freestyle/wave boards and sails to go with. But this is up to you. If you're not in racing you can still compromise on two boards and three/four sails. This been said, we are not always reasonable and sometimes play the game manufacturers like us to.

Last edited by Farlo; 22nd August 2009 at 10:10 PM.
Farlo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23rd August 2009, 02:38 PM   #18
yankiwi
New Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 15
Default

You are right. It has been worth the time and pain. I am now very much addicted. I just need to convince my wife it is worth the money - since I now want the next size smaller board (I already own 3 after 9 months).
yankiwi is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23rd August 2009, 04:55 PM   #19
Farlo
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 528
Default

Welcome in the family. There is a tendancy to go smaller after a few months because you ordinary start big. However the next size down may overlap significantly with the board just above. Look at the recommended sail range. It shall bring you ~1.5 extra sqm down, with ~1 sqm overlap. Ideally you have just one sail to bridge two boards. Don't get me wrong: ten liters and a few cm OFO make a difference on water, but certainly one of two adjacent boards is better suited for you an your spot. You can also compensate for moderate volume or width variations with some extra tuning and adequate fins.

Last edited by Farlo; 24th August 2009 at 10:55 PM.
Farlo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26th August 2009, 03:51 AM   #20
michelb
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Chile, Santiago
Posts: 92
Send a message via MSN to michelb
Default

Hello All,
My case is inverse. I start in 1982 with a Carrera and Race 6,3 sail, then I quit and in 1995 start again as all of you loading a lot of Board bags boom bags and sail bags + fins etc...... in the roof of my little Fiat Cinquecento from 1996. Was very funny to see ( and think) that is more money over the roof than the car itself...... Then Marry......

Today I just have a wife, 5 kids, a Van and a Formula 161 Board, with 2 sails( Vapor 10 mt and 11 mts), 1 boom, 2 masts (one for each sail)+ 2 fins (Drake R19 + Select R03 DC Wide). With this quiver I can decently sail in almost all conditions form 10 to 25 knots. That is amazing. I sell my anemometer and now if is less than 15 knots ===>11 mts + Select if is more ( whitecaps), =====> 10 mts with Drake R19 ( thinking seriously in a Debo R13+6. ( half price for all the quiver than before).

This year I probably keep my board for another year and buy a 2nd Vapor 10 mts ( 2nd hand as a spare because my 10 is the most used). I know some of you think Formula is another sport, and nearly not windsurfing...... but it gives me a lot of TOW and fun. That is the really important thing when you have less time and a big non windsurfing family.

Saludos desde Chile!!
Thanks SB for the Formula.
michelb is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +7. The time now is 09:07 AM.