Old 25th April 2008, 02:47 PM   #1
Shane
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Default New Board

It is time to buy a new board. I have been windsurfing now for 6 months on an old longboard (70cm wide) and have got the basics.

I can - Plane although not consistantly
- Hook into a harness while planing

I can't - Water start
- Gybe
- get into any footstraps

I am 40yrs+ 90kgs and sail in a bay on flat water (although choppy) and I want my new board for typically 15 - 25 knts. Higher than 25 knts and I can't see myself going out (scary and physically demanding at the moment). I am not selling the longboard and can use it in sub 15knts when the kids have a good time on it as well.

At this stage I don't want any speed thrills or tricks I only want to get into the footstraps, plane consistantly and make all this as easy as possible.

I am seriously looking at a Futura 145. I have compared it with other makes of this size and it is generally a bit shorter and a bit wider (particularly at the tail) than other makes. I have checked the website for comments but all manufacturers websites say there boards are easier to use and quicker to plane !!

My questions are;
Am I looking at the right Starboard board? Should I go larger volume? I have been on another 145 litre board in light conditions but could uphaul it OK.

If so, how and why will the different dimensions of the Futura perform differently compared to the other boards I have looked at.

Thanks
Shane
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Old 26th April 2008, 04:51 AM   #2
Roger
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Hi Shane,
Looks like you've done your research on this.
I pretty much agree, but wonder why you've selected the Futura 144 over say the GO 144 (same shape, different/more robust construction).
At your weight (90 Kg./198 lbs.) a little more volume (GO/Futura 155) might be helpful.
To get from where you are (skill level) to fully planing, hooked in and in the footstraps, there are going to be a few "trips over the front/catapaults" and the heavier but more robust TufSkin construction might serve you well.
As far as comparisons with other boards, the Futura/GO range are indeed very easy to sail and should help you to progress as quickly as possilbe.
Hope this helps,
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Old 26th April 2008, 05:41 AM   #3
Shane
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Thanks Roger,

The local Starboard shop encouraged me more towards the Futura 144 because "it was simply a better board and I would go alot further on it". I feel that may have been because he had one in stock to sell me. This is one of the reasons for this query. I believe the Go may have footstrap positions that would be easier to get into.

I am currently experiencing a few catapults on the long board as I am not in the footstraps and this is usually how it finishes once I get planing. It was fun at first but now is getting tiresome having to get back on and uphaul. I have already had to repair the nose of the board after a big catapult in 20knts. I have now developed a technique were I hang on mid catapult and end up right around the front of the board in the water rather than hitting the gear. Some advice from another sailor has helped. He advised to put the boom a bit higher, bend my knees more getting more downward pressure through the harness. This has helped, particularly when bearing off the wind a bit which was when cataplts were happening.

If you feel the larger volume will help or be easier to achieve my goals, I am more inclined to go that way as the resale market where I am is very good and it won't cost me much to change later if I advance that far. However, will the larger volume board be more difficult to sail in 20-25 knts

When comparing with other boards I believe that the wider starboard board tail should offer more stability when planing which I would interpret as easier. I don't know if it would make it quicker to get on the plane.

Thank for the advice so far.

Shane
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Old 26th April 2008, 08:31 AM   #4
Roger
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Hi Shane,
I'll paste in your reply here and then answer each section seperately:

"The local Starboard shop encouraged me more towards the Futura 144 because "it was simply a better board and I would go alot further on it". I feel that may have been because he had one in stock to sell me. This is one of the reasons for this query. I believe the Go may have footstrap positions that would be easier to get into."

Two things jump out at us here!
If the GO 144 and the Futura 144 are exactly the same shape, only the weight being different (the GO TufSkin being heavier due to the more ding resistant and heavy duty
construction) I'm not quite sure how the Futura will "take you further".
Yes, eventually you will want a smaller board for higher winds and smaller rigs, but
the GO Tufskin (144= 11 Kg. 155= 11.75 Kg.) and Futura 144 (WOOD= 8.3 Kg. /Technora= 8.9 Kg.) or Futura 155 (WOOD= 8.75 Kg./Technora= 9.3 Kg)
should take you equally as far until you are ready for that smaller board.
AS far as the footstrap inserts, yes, the GO 144 and 155 do have a set or 2 of very far forward footstrap positions, but they are for absolute beginners, and are somewhat dangerous in my opinion (too close to the impact radius of the mast around the mast foot).
The board really won't plane mch at all if you are that far forward on the board, so I find them to be a "nice feature", but otherwise pretty useless.

"I am currently experiencing a few catapults on the long board as I am not in the footstraps and this is usually how it finishes once I get planing. It was fun at first but now is getting tiresome having to get back on and uphaul. I have already had to repair the nose of the board after a big catapult in 20knts. I have now developed a technique were I hang on mid catapult and end up right around the front of the board in the water rather than hitting the gear. Some advice from another sailor has helped. He advised to put the boom a bit higher, bend my knees more getting more downward pressure through the harness. This has helped, particularly when bearing off the wind a bit which was when cataplts were happening.
I may have a better solution to the catapaults.
Get some adjustable harness lines. Then you can adjust the length of your lines out on the water while underway so you don't have to move the boom to compensate for lines that are too short/long.
What size sails are you using now? What type sail (brand/model)?
If you decide to bear off, you need to sheet out as you change the rigs angle to the wind, or you will always get tossed. The rig just loads up further and further back until you can't hold it anymore.
Also, you seem to feel that getting your feet in the footstraps is going to prevent you from catapaulting.
In my experience, this is not the case. They help in this respect, but you really need to learn to keep the pressure/loading in your rig at a level you
can handle. This is done by trimming the sail (sheeting in or out to maintain good pressure, but bleeding off "too much" pressure.
The footstraps allow you to control the board and prevent your feet from
bouncing off the board when it bounds over chop.


"If you feel the larger volume will help or be easier to achieve my goals, I am more inclined to go that way as the resale market where I am is very good and it won't cost me much to change later if I advance that far. However, will the larger volume board be more difficult to sail in 20-25 knts"
Yes, it's true that you will need a smaller board for 20-25 knots. You'll need a smaller rig as well.
How much of your sailing is in 20-25 knots and how much of it is in windspeeds < 18 knots?................< 15 knots..........< 12 knots?
Your older longboard is OK, but modern wide early planing shortboards, with larger (8.5 m2 and larger) rigs will have you planing in 10-12 knots.
This is fully planing, not what you are experiencing on your longboard (which longboard do you have?).
At your weight, the slightly larger 155 will get you planing earlier.
You can easily handle the Futura or GO 155 up to 20 knots.
Beyond 18-20 knots, both the 144 and 155 versions are going to be a bit
too big.
For 20 knots and up you need a 100-120 liter board.


"When comparing with other boards I believe that the wider starboard board tail should offer more stability when planing which I would interpret as easier. I don't know if it would make it quicker to get on the plane."
Stability when planing is not the issue.
Wider tail widths allow you to control longer fins and longer fins allow you to plane earlier.
Once on plane, and within the range of the fin, wide tail shortboards are faster, sail upwind higher, and plane much earlier.
Hope this helps,

Last edited by Roger; 26th April 2008 at 09:07 AM.
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Old 26th April 2008, 03:24 PM   #5
Shane
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Hi Roger,

Firstly thanks for your time answering these queries.

I am currently on one of the early Kona longboards with a 6.3m North Sails wave sail. The sail is something I bought secondhand and I don't think it is a specific longboard sail.

The conditions I sail in vary as I have to take what I can get on the weekend around other family commitments. Predominately it is between 13knts to 18knts, occasionally up to 25 knts. Perhaps I need to concentrate on this wind bracket and sit out anything over 20knts untill I improve.

I can understand your comments about the Go being tougher and further research indicates that the Go boards are also $500- $600 cheaper than the Futura boards. Nothing would pain me more than a new Futura that needs to be repaired after an "over the front" experience like one of my previous.

Thanks for the advice about the relationship between fins and width. I didn't know this so I have learnt something today.

I actually have a set of adjustable harness lines but find them difficult to adjust so just leave them on their longest setting. Notwithstanding I think I just need more time on the water and perhaps to expand the range of equipment I have. I am gradually building on this so as not to break the budget to quickly. I understand the concept of sheeting out as I have sailed before. I am however still trying to come to grips with feet and rig position.

Thanks again
Shane
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Old 13th May 2008, 08:43 PM   #6
windsurferdagg
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Default go with the go

Go with the GO! I progressed well on my Go 139 (being around 145 pounds, 68 kg) last season. Now I find that wanted more speed and performance. I think once you get the thrill of getting in the footstraps and harness, you will too ;-). It is truely addicting and deffinatly hooked me for life.

With the Go for me, the only reason I sold it was it was WAY too big for me. I think my biggest board at my weight now (150 pounds) could easily be 100-110L. I think for you, the Go would be an excellent light wind board with a sick fin later on when you improve more :-)

Roger is excellent at answering stance questions. I know he helped me A LOT!

Tip on waterstarts that REALLY helped me. Just go out to where you can touch (shoulder deep) in powered up-overpowered winds and fly the rig. Lookat the mast foot and push with your front leg. Do a session like that and you will find that the next time you try waterstarts... they are cake :-)
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