Go Back   Starboard Forums > Free Forum

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 8th June 2011, 11:24 PM   #11
Ken
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Dallas, Texas USA
Posts: 799
Default

I am so glad that my formula sailing is "quite technical, requires high ability and high strength".

I am reasonably skilled, but I am 66 years old, and weigh 78kg. While I don't push my big rigs (11.0 & 9.2) to the limits of most formula sailors, I nevertheless have great fun planing fast in winds where only the long boards are cruising around. I rarely drop the sails, but I do have "easy up-hauls" on my three largest sails so I don't waste my strength up-hauling if the need arises.

Formula isn't that tough, but it can be pretty darn exciting running down wind with a big sail in 15 to 20 knots.
__________________
Toys:
Formula 160; iSonic 111; HiFly Move 105; Tiga 263; '85 Mistral Superlight.
Maui Sails TR 11.0; 9.2; 8.4; 7.6; 6.6; Maui Sails Switch 6.0; 5.2; Maui Sails Global 4.5; 4.0.
Ken is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12th June 2011, 11:34 PM   #12
SeanAUS120
Dream Team Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Brisbane, Australia // Dokkum, Netherlands
Posts: 147
Send a message via Skype™ to SeanAUS120
Default

The official feeder class is the BIC; which is great because it can either feed in to RS:X or FW essentially. In AUS we also kind of use the RS:X class as a feeder also as most of our RS:X fleet comes to the formula nationals and just chucks their 9.5 on a FW (and do quite well) - including our Olympians! Often the guys who don't continue on with RS:X after the trials but still want to race get involved with FW.

For sure its "quite technical", but certainly that is the appeal?
__________________
GetWindsurfFit.com // The Ultimate Windsurfing Fitness Program.
SeanAUS120 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13th June 2011, 02:22 AM   #13
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SeanAUS120 View Post
For sure its "quite technical", but certainly that is the appeal?
absolutely. The very limited appeal to a very small number of people, hence its decline.
  Reply With Quote
Old 13th June 2011, 10:19 PM   #14
Ken
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Dallas, Texas USA
Posts: 799
Default

I also think the cost of formula gear causes many to stay away as well as the perception that the "giant" sails are impossible to manage. If you get comfortable with 6 and 7 meter sails as your largest, the 11 & 12 meters sails do seem "giant" and hard to manage. However, once your skill level gets to the point of rarely dropping the sail, staying powered and balance while hooked in is pretty comfortable.

While I only race formula a couple of times a year, I will likely stick with the gear simply because it is wonderful to be planing relatively fast in 10-15 knots of wind when most windsurfers are still at home.

My first choice for fun windsurfing is my bump and jump board in 20+ knots. Second is my iS slalom board in 12-20 knots, then formula in 8-15 knots.

Formula isn't for everyone, but some will find it fun and exhilarating. One side benefit is that after a session on a 9 or 11 meter sail, dropping down to a 7.6 on a slalom board feels like you have a napkin in your hands.
__________________
Toys:
Formula 160; iSonic 111; HiFly Move 105; Tiga 263; '85 Mistral Superlight.
Maui Sails TR 11.0; 9.2; 8.4; 7.6; 6.6; Maui Sails Switch 6.0; 5.2; Maui Sails Global 4.5; 4.0.
Ken is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13th June 2011, 11:10 PM   #15
sergio k
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

[QUOTE=quite technical. The very limited appeal to a very small number of people, hence its decline]

Any course racing is technical, and you have to be great to win, but rec. FW is very easy,
lots of people I know use it as their first board to learn on. Biggest problem is lack of support
from industry, PWA, Olympics, etc... So, it's the class that survived despite all that and only supported
by volunteer efforts... why??? Because it's the most fun, challenging discipline windsurfing has, and you
only need 1 board, 1 fin, 2 sails to cover range from 6 to 25 kn, and you're flying between the buoys...
To start racing all you need to know, how to tack, basic jibes and how to use harness...
  Reply With Quote
Old 16th June 2011, 05:39 PM   #16
Floyd
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 459
Default

Ken
"quite technical, requires high ability and high strength"
All windsurfing is /does.(If you are making effort !!)
Segio
"but rec. FW is very easy"
"Because it's the most fun, challenging discipline windsurfing has"
"To start racing all you need to know, how to tack, basic jibes and how to use harness..."

Think thats a bit contentious;contradictory and probably plain wrong on all counts !!

Are we saying Formula is more fun than sailing Hookipa ?? Requires more strength than a wave sailor/speed sailor?? Thats why it died out in UK then?

Personally find racing around bouys a touch egotistical and pointless (there`s only one winner and a fleet of disappointed sailors (well 2 anyway nowadays) But if you enjoy it fine, but dont over promote it at cost to other disciplines.
Floyd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16th June 2011, 09:08 PM   #17
Ken
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Dallas, Texas USA
Posts: 799
Default

Floyd,

The quote I posted "quite technical, requires high ability and high strength" came from post #9. I was only mocking his statement a little, since I am 66 years old and weight 77kg and sail formula.

While formula can be extremely demanding, both physically and mentally, it doesn't have to with proper trimming and staying within one's limits. And as you said, it's the same with all windsurfing (wave, freestyle, slalom, freeride and even longboard).

Strength is no doubt an asset, but focus, skill and technique can compensate for some shortcomings in strength.

Most windsurfers aren't into racing, but when I started windsurfing (and racing) in 1984, I quickly found that "racing around buoys" was "not egotistical or pointless". Racing requires you to sail in directions and conditions that you would not normally choose if freeriding. This forces the racer to improve his skills at a much more rapid rate than the guy reaching out and back for a couple of hours.

I wanted to be a better windsurfer and racing taught me how to point high; run deep; tack and jibe quickly (at a specific point; not where it is most comfortable); maximize the efficiency of the sail & board by tuning and trimming; hover a longboard or formula board at the starting line (keeping the board in a 10 meter box in 20 knots of wind); plus many other techniques. And for me, it was and still is fun.

Comparing oneself to others is human nature, be it in the office, in your car, on the running track, soccer field, swimming pool, billiards hall, etc. etc. We all want to see how we measure up against our peers and sailing around some buoys is just one of a hundred ways we can do it. Wanting to race a windsurfer is not so unusual, is it? You too are probably involved in some "egotistical and pointless" competition on occasion, correct?
__________________
Toys:
Formula 160; iSonic 111; HiFly Move 105; Tiga 263; '85 Mistral Superlight.
Maui Sails TR 11.0; 9.2; 8.4; 7.6; 6.6; Maui Sails Switch 6.0; 5.2; Maui Sails Global 4.5; 4.0.
Ken is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16th June 2011, 11:32 PM   #18
sergio k
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Floyd View Post
Ken
"quite technical, requires high ability and high strength"
All windsurfing is /does.(If you are making effort !!)
Segio
"but rec. FW is very easy"
"Because it's the most fun, challenging discipline windsurfing has"
"To start racing all you need to know, how to tack, basic jibes and how to use harness..."

Think thats a bit contentious;contradictory and probably plain wrong on all counts !!

Are we saying Formula is more fun than sailing Hookipa ?? Requires more strength than a wave sailor/speed sailor?? Thats why it died out in UK then?

Personally find racing around bouys a touch egotistical and pointless (there`s only one winner and a fleet of disappointed sailors (well 2 anyway nowadays) But if you enjoy it fine, but dont over promote it at cost to other disciplines.
by most fun discipline, I mean racing discipline... and also, freeriding in light wind locations

if there was >18 knots regularly in my location, chances are I would be on my wave board with a 5.0 m2,
but our winds are 7-12 kn
  Reply With Quote
Old 17th June 2011, 12:36 AM   #19
Floyd
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 459
Default

Thats different !
Apologies.Misunderstood your post.
Good sailing.

Ofcourse I was Ken
Responding to the overstating case for Formula

Last edited by Floyd; 17th June 2011 at 12:40 AM.
Floyd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17th June 2011, 12:43 AM   #20
BelSkorpio
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Belgium
Posts: 479
Default

Not that long time ago, I was talking with an ex formula competition sailor.
The way he explained it, FW can be one of the most exhausting disciplines.

Often they need to carry the wide board + 12m gear (quite heavy) on very wide sandy beaches for a long distance to reach the water. Arriving at the water, already tired, heated up and full of sweat, they often encounter a strong shore break where they have to go through, trying not to drop the 12m sail into the water and manage their way to the more clean & open sea. There somtimes waits a huge swell with lots of chop, very eager to tear down all that nice but rather heavy equipment. Do you get a little bit the picture ...

Don't get me wrong, I like FW. But I've seen a competition going on at the rough baltic sea in Poland and I say "Respect, to all FW competition surfers out there !"
__________________
IS87 / IS101 / IS122 / US147
BelSkorpio is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Volume, sail size, dead wind slogging MuXx Ask Our Team 10 22nd April 2009 11:34 AM
These forums are now DEAD! Where to ask now? Guest Free Forum 33 11th May 2007 07:59 PM


All times are GMT +7. The time now is 05:35 PM.