Old 16th December 2008, 01:14 AM   #1
jago25_98
New Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 7
Default Better than a wetsuit?

I don't really think a wetsuit is really the best thing for a sport mostly out of the water.

What could be better?

A dry suit?
A semi dry suit?

Has anyone tried something different like this? Was it warmer?
jago25_98 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16th December 2008, 02:40 PM   #2
kennatt
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 33
Default

a dry suit or semi is ok if you are out of the water but once in the water which you often are then the heat transfer from you to the cold water is greater than that in a wet suit which offers better insulation . Good wet suits are also more flexible but then its all down to personal preference .Fair winds.
kennatt is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16th December 2008, 03:47 PM   #3
John Kemsley
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 59
Default

It would depend on the air and water temperatures respectivly, nice summer day = shorts and rash vest. It also dpends on how often you fall in!!

Dont forget you can buy different wetsuits for different seasons
John Kemsley is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16th December 2008, 04:09 PM   #4
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kennatt View Post
a dry suit or semi is ok if you are out of the water but once in the water which you often are then the heat transfer from you to the cold water is greater than that in a wet suit which offers better insulation . Good wet suits are also more flexible but then its all down to personal preference .Fair winds.
I am sorry but that is all wrong. Have you already tried one ?

The Drysuit offer much more protection against cold than a wetsuit. In fact you are totally isolated from the outside (zero water, zero windchill). You are so much isolated that you can easily get too warm, even when the water is +5C and the air +5C or below.

In countrys like canada, danemark, sweden etc ... they only use that.

Your body is not wasting energy to warm up the water layer which is between your skin and the suit like in a wetsuit. This water layer has to be warmed up again and again and again ...

In top of that the Drysuit is much more flexible than the drysuit if you choose the correct size, just try one ...
  Reply With Quote
Old 16th December 2008, 06:24 PM   #5
nonopr
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: San Juan, Puerto Rico
Posts: 573
Thumbs up This is what I recommend? Forget about the old fashion Dry Suit.

check this out.

http://www.ripcurl.com/index.php?hbomb



Quote:
Originally Posted by jago25_98 View Post
I don't really think a wetsuit is really the best thing for a sport mostly out of the water.

What could be better?

A dry suit?
A semi dry suit?

Has anyone tried something different like this? Was it warmer?
nonopr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 16th December 2008, 09:47 PM   #6
Floyd
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 459
Cool Heated Suits ????

From someone who managed to set their mountain bike on fire with lighting equipment not sure I will be trying an electrically heated wet suit.(Will it make tea aswell ?)
Batteries ; heating elements; neopreme and salt water dont sound a good mix to me !!
Resultant burns would take some explaining; (like my insurance claim for spontaneous combusting mountain bike).

On a serious note; problem isnt producing the heat (your thighs will produce 5 times more than 2 lithium batteries ever could) problem is keeping the heat in and at right places !
How many times have you sailed with a warm torso (your own that is) but freezing fingers/toes ??
Dont think my chest;shoulders etc are ever cold; its the extremities, which heated suits will not help. (Heated diving suits circulate hot water everywhere)
(Yes I know keeping torso/kidneys warm helps everywhere; but heat loss from that bit of hot suit will be incredble.)
Floyd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17th December 2008, 12:17 AM   #7
Ken
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Dallas, Texas USA
Posts: 799
Default

Bottom Line -

Figure on worse case scenario - equipment breakdown and you have to sit or swim for an hour or more. If your suit won't protect you in this situation, don't go out.


Ken
Ken is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17th December 2008, 01:06 AM   #8
nonopr
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: San Juan, Puerto Rico
Posts: 573
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Floyd View Post
From someone who managed to set their mountain bike on fire with lighting equipment not sure I will be trying an electrically heated wet suit.(Will it make tea aswell ?)
Batteries ; heating elements; neopreme and salt water dont sound a good mix to me !!
Resultant burns would take some explaining; (like my insurance claim for spontaneous combusting mountain bike).

On a serious note; problem isnt producing the heat (your thighs will produce 5 times more than 2 lithium batteries ever could) problem is keeping the heat in and at right places !
How many times have you sailed with a warm torso (your own that is) but freezing fingers/toes ??
Dont think my chest;shoulders etc are ever cold; its the extremities, which heated suits will not help. (Heated diving suits circulate hot water everywhere)
(Yes I know keeping torso/kidneys warm helps everywhere; but heat loss from that bit of hot suit will be incredble.)
That is the worst comment I have ever read in regar this suit. Please learn first how your body gets warn and then comment .
You blood circulates to all of your body the heating element in the suit attacks the back , Why? because is the closest part to your lungs where all the blood is taken for oxigenation. And if all your blood is warm you arm will be warm all the way to your finger tips. RipCurl tested this suit for 3 year before going to market and not one of the RipCurl surfers ever suffer of any cold fingertips even surfing in the artic circle At -10 Celcius.
The heating element is cover and not in touch with your body, plus all the connections are water proof. RipCurl has made wetsuits for over 40 years and You might think that, if they come up with a suit like this it would be water proof or to the elements. Check the website in detail, so you get to learn technology is help not a handicap.
nonopr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17th December 2008, 02:26 AM   #9
Per
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 237
Default

Hi.
I live and windsurf in Denmark, and to me around zero days (celcius) are normal for four months a year. It's actually not that complicated. I use a Gul drysuit. Not neoprene but made from the same fabric as normal sailing clothes though being waterproof in all openings. I wear some fleece and cotton underwear under it. Put on some Da Kine cold water mitts, a thin neoprene helmet if it gets really cold, and finally some not too thick boots (5 mm is plenty, anything above and you will loose control and contact).
I can go surfing for hours. The Gul suit feels lighter and more comfortable than a normal wet suit and I never freeze while rigging. I used to have a NP neoprene 6/4 dry suit. It was only dry for a few weeks, it fealt heavy and compromised my body movements a lot. It fell apart after three seasons.
To me neoprene is out of the question for winter windsurfing.

;-)
Per
Per is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 17th December 2008, 05:08 AM   #10
Unregistered
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Default after the wetsuit comes the suit of the future

Check out Dave Graneys 'suit of the future'. Extreme style. The Aussies will know.
How do you post pictures?
  Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
None

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT +7. The time now is 10:58 AM.